sherd


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sherd

 (shûrd)
n.
Variant of shard.

sherd

(ʃɜːd)
n
a variant of shard

shard

(ʃɑrd)

also sherd



n.
1. a fragment, esp. of broken earthenware.
2. Zool.
a. a scale.
b. a shell, as of an egg or snail.
c. the hardened forewing of a beetle; elytron.
[before 1000; Middle English; Old English sceard, c. Old Frisian skerd, Middle High German scharte, Old Norse skarth; akin to shear]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sherd - a broken piece of a brittle artifactsherd - a broken piece of a brittle artifact
piece - a separate part of a whole; "an important piece of the evidence"
potsherd - a shard of pottery
References in periodicals archive ?
* porous structure of the sherd after the temper of limestone/crushed shells/burned bone was leached out;
At least one sherd pertaining to this type but reported as Desprecio Incised from the Ah Pam collection of the Yaxha-Sacnab Lakes was published by Rice ([68]: Figure 4cc; [67]: 138).
The other three samples -the two vessel sediments (conchos) from samples MRI 0102 and MRI 0107, and the sherd brushing (on MRI 0010)- were positive for starch grains but negative for macro-remains, not showing any identifiable plant remains (e.g., cuticle or grains).
From the results researchers can see how all the pores are interconnected, and this yields information not only about the production method of the sherd but also its origin," Solling added.
In particular, excavations in 2004/5 have revealed circular sherd settings and horizontal band handles of kangs typical of Bohai archaeological culture.
There may be a great deal of additional information, however, that can be "read" from that sherd, with the proper tools.
Ostraka is an ancient Greek term originally for broken pottery sherds inscribed with a person's name, once used as voting ballots to exile unpopular members of the community--who would thus be 'ostracized'.
An object could be simply an engraved sherd from a site in Arkansas.
I report two significant advances in our knowledge of the human occupation of the Torres Strait: new radiocarbon estimates for the antiquity of settlement of the Murray Islands, eastern Torres Strait, and a description of the recovery and petrographic analysis of several earthenware pottery sherds, the first to be recovered from the Torres Strait Islands and the earliest evidence of pre-European trade links between the Torres Strait and New Guinea.
Each sample sherd was cut to fit on a glass microscope slide measuring 27 by 46 mm.
Paul is an honest and straightforward investigator, who examines every sherd of evidence with much the same detachment as an archeologist, as do most of those involved in UFO matters; but belief in intelligently controlled UFOs, however convincing appearing the evidence, does not raise it out of the realm of speculation.