schwa

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schwa

 (shwä)
n.
1. A mid-central neutral vowel, typically occurring in unstressed syllables, as the final vowel of English sofa.
2. The symbol (ə) used to represent an unstressed neutral vowel and, in some systems of phonetic transcription, a stressed mid-central vowel, as in but.

[German, from Hebrew šəwā', probably from Syriac (nuqzē) šwayyā, even (points), pl. passive participle of šwā, to be even; see šwy in Semitic roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

schwa

(ʃwɑː) or

shwa

n
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) a central vowel represented in the International Phonetic Alphabet by (ə). The sound occurs in unstressed syllables in English, as in around, mother, and sofa
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) the symbol (ə) used to represent this sound
[C19: via German from Hebrew shewā, a diacritic indicating lack of a vowel sound]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

schwa

or shwa

(ʃwɑ)

n., pl. schwas or shwas.
1. the mid-central, neutral vowel sound typically occurring in unstressed syllables in English, as the sound of a in alone and sofa or u in circus.
2. the phonetic symbol ə, used to represent this sound.
[1890–95; < German < Hebrew shəwā name of a diacritic marking schwa or no vowel]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.schwa - a neutral middle vowel; occurs in unstressed syllables
vowel, vowel sound - a speech sound made with the vocal tract open
murmur vowel, murmur - a schwa that is incidental to the pronunciation of a consonant
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

schwa

schwah [ʃwɑː] Nvocal f neutra
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

schwa

n (Phon) → Schwa nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Anne Shevas, Number 10's chief press officer, was standing in for Mr Kelly and fellow official spokesman Godric Smith.
Ms Shevas said: 'I don't know where this story has come from.
Ms Shevas said: 'Any conversation was simply looking at the questions for all concerned that the inquiry would have to answer.
As Michael Ragussis observes, The Jew "represented a revolution in the representation of Jewish identity on the English stage." (2) Imitated by playwrights and novelists alike, Cumberland's benevolent ffebrew, Sheva, became the ancestor of Rebecca in Sir Walter Scott's Ivanhoe, of Daniel in George Eliot's Daniel Deronda, and of the Monteverdos, father and daughter, in Maria Edgeworth's Harrington, characters deployed, like Sheva, to counter anti-Semitic prejudice.
What is remarkable about the play, nevertheless, as we will see, is the extensive knowledge of Jewish values, practices, and historical circumstances it displays, and the fact that Cumberland managed to sketch in Sheva a composite but recognizable eighteenth-century Jew.
Sheva, the Jew, comes on the scene as Bertram's broker at "Change Alley," the eighteenth-century stock exchange; he soon becomes a moneylender too, when, after being banished and disowned by his father for secretly marrying Eliza, Frederic asks Sheva for a loan of three hundred pounds to enable him to support her.