shield


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shield

 (shēld)
n.
1. A broad piece of armor made of rigid material and strapped to the arm or carried in the hand for protection against hurled or thrusted weapons.
2. A person or thing that provides protection.
3. A protective device or structure, as:
a. A steel sheet attached to an artillery piece to protect gunners from small-arms fire and shrapnel.
b. Physics A wall or housing of concrete or lead built around a nuclear reactor to prevent the escape of radiation.
c. Electronics A structure or arrangement of metal plates or mesh designed to protect a piece of electronic equipment from electrostatic or magnetic interference.
d. A pad worn, as at the armpits, to protect a garment from perspiration.
e. A sanitary napkin.
4. Zoology A protective plate or similar hard outer covering; a scute or scutellum.
5. Something that resembles a shield, as:
a. An escutcheon.
b. A decorative emblem that often serves to identify an organization or a government.
c. A police officer's badge.
6. Geology The ancient, stable, interior layer of continents composed of primarily Precambrian igneous or metamorphic rocks. Also called continental shield.
v. shield·ed, shield·ing, shields
v.tr.
1. To protect from being attacked, exposed to danger, or subjected to difficulty: "a policymaking elite whose families and purses are shielded from the sacrifices war entails" (Uwe E. Reinhardt). See Synonyms at defend.
2. To cover up; conceal: "Though many eyes were watching, none could pierce the halo of morning sunlight that surrounded and shielded the hawk" (Peter Dunne).
v.intr.
To act or serve as a shield or safeguard.

[Middle English sheld, from Old English scield; see skel- in Indo-European roots.]

shield′er n.

shield

(ʃiːld)
n
1. (Arms & Armour (excluding Firearms)) any protection used to intercept blows, missiles, etc, such as a tough piece of armour carried on the arm
2. any similar protective device
3. (Heraldry) heraldry Also called: scutcheon or escutcheon a pointed stylized shield used for displaying armorial bearings
4. anything that resembles a shield in shape, such as a prize in a sports competition
5. (Zoology) the protective outer covering of an animal, such as the shell of a turtle
6. (Nuclear Physics) physics a structure of concrete, lead, etc, placed around a nuclear reactor or other source of radiation in order to prevent the escape of radiation
7. (Geological Science) a broad stable plateau of ancient Precambrian rocks forming the rigid nucleus of a particular continent. See Baltic Shield, Canadian Shield
8. (Clothing & Fashion) short for dress shield
9. (Civil Engineering) civil engineering a hollow steel cylinder that protects men driving a circular tunnel through loose, soft, or water-bearing ground
10. (Cricket) Austral short for the Sheffield Shield
11. (Rugby) NZ short for the Ranfurly Shield
vb
(tr) to protect, hide, or conceal (something) from danger or harm
[Old English scield; related to Old Norse skjöldr, Gothic skildus, Old High German scilt shield, Old English sciell shell]
ˈshielder n
ˈshieldˌlike adj

shield

(ʃild)

n.
1. a device used as a defense against blows or hurled objects, esp. a broad piece of armor carried on the arm or in the hand.
2. a person or thing that guards or defends.
3. any of various devices or barriers for protection, as from injury.
4. an escutcheon typically having a broad top and pointed bottom and displaying armorial bearings.
5. something shaped like a shield.
6. a police officer's, detective's, or sheriff's badge.
7. a bulletproof screen attached to a gun to protect its crew, mechanism, etc.
8. a protective plate or the like on the body of an animal, as a scute, enlarged scale, etc.
9. a pad worn or attached inside the underarm of a garment to protect it against perspiration stains.
10. a vast area of ancient crustal rocks which, together with a platform, constitutes a craton.
11. a lead or concrete structure around a nuclear reactor serving as a barrier against escaping radiation.
v.t.
12. to protect with or as if with a shield.
13. to serve as a protection for.
14. to hide or conceal; protect by hiding.
15. Obs. to avert; forbid.
v.i.
16. to act or serve as a shield.
[before 900; Old English sceld, c. Old Frisian skeld, Old High German skilt, Old Norse skjǫldr, Gothic skildus]
shield′er, n.
shield′less, adj.

shield


Past participle: shielded
Gerund: shielding

Imperative
shield
shield
Present
I shield
you shield
he/she/it shields
we shield
you shield
they shield
Preterite
I shielded
you shielded
he/she/it shielded
we shielded
you shielded
they shielded
Present Continuous
I am shielding
you are shielding
he/she/it is shielding
we are shielding
you are shielding
they are shielding
Present Perfect
I have shielded
you have shielded
he/she/it has shielded
we have shielded
you have shielded
they have shielded
Past Continuous
I was shielding
you were shielding
he/she/it was shielding
we were shielding
you were shielding
they were shielding
Past Perfect
I had shielded
you had shielded
he/she/it had shielded
we had shielded
you had shielded
they had shielded
Future
I will shield
you will shield
he/she/it will shield
we will shield
you will shield
they will shield
Future Perfect
I will have shielded
you will have shielded
he/she/it will have shielded
we will have shielded
you will have shielded
they will have shielded
Future Continuous
I will be shielding
you will be shielding
he/she/it will be shielding
we will be shielding
you will be shielding
they will be shielding
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been shielding
you have been shielding
he/she/it has been shielding
we have been shielding
you have been shielding
they have been shielding
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been shielding
you will have been shielding
he/she/it will have been shielding
we will have been shielding
you will have been shielding
they will have been shielding
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been shielding
you had been shielding
he/she/it had been shielding
we had been shielding
you had been shielding
they had been shielding
Conditional
I would shield
you would shield
he/she/it would shield
we would shield
you would shield
they would shield
Past Conditional
I would have shielded
you would have shielded
he/she/it would have shielded
we would have shielded
you would have shielded
they would have shielded
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shield - a protective covering or structureshield - a protective covering or structure  
nipple shield - a rubber or plastic shield to protect the nipples of nursing women
scale, shell, plate - a metal sheathing of uniform thickness (such as the shield attached to an artillery piece to protect the gunners)
protective cover, protective covering, protection - a covering that is intend to protect from damage or injury; "they had no protection from the fallout"; "wax provided protection for the floors"
shielding - a shield of lead or concrete intended as a barrier to radiation emitted in nuclear decay
shielding - shield consisting of an arrangement of metal mesh or plates designed to protect electronic equipment from ambient electromagnetic interference
2.shield - armor carried on the arm to intercept blowsshield - armor carried on the arm to intercept blows
armor, armour - protective covering made of metal and used in combat
scutcheon, escutcheon - a shield; especially one displaying a coat of arms
pavis, pavise - (Middle Ages) a large heavy oblong shield protecting the whole body; originally carried but sometimes set up in permanent position
3.shield - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtlesshield - hard outer covering or case of certain organisms such as arthropods and turtles
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
arthropod - invertebrate having jointed limbs and a segmented body with an exoskeleton made of chitin
cuticula - the outer body wall of an insect
scute - large bony or horny plate as on an armadillo or turtle or the underside of a snake
mollusc, mollusk, shellfish - invertebrate having a soft unsegmented body usually enclosed in a shell
shell - the material that forms the hard outer covering of many animals
Verb1.shield - protect, hide, or conceal from danger or harm
protect - shield from danger, injury, destruction, or damage; "Weatherbeater protects your roof from the rain"
2.shield - hold back a thought or feeling about; "She is harboring a grudge against him"
conceal, hide - prevent from being seen or discovered; "Muslim women hide their faces"; "hide the money"

shield

noun
1. protection, cover, defence, screen, guard, ward (archaic), shelter, safeguard, aegis, rampart, bulwark innocents used as a human shield against attack
2. buckler, escutcheon (Heraldry), targe (archaic) a warrior with sword and shield
verb
1. protect, cover, screen, guard, defend, shelter, safeguard He shielded his head from the sun with an old sack.

shield

noun
The act or a means of defending:
verb
To keep safe from danger, attack, or harm:
Archaic: fend.
Translations
تُرْسترْسدِرْعوِقايَه، وِقاءيَحْمي، يَقي
štítchránitkrytodznakzakrývat
skjoldafskærmebeskyttepræmiepladeskærme for
kaitse
kilpisuojasuojata
štit
pajzsvédelem
skjöldurskÿlaskÿla, hlífa, verndaverîlaunaskjöldurvernda
保護する保護物
방패을 보호하다
scutum
apsaugaskydasženklelis
aizklātaizsargātaizsargsaizsegsaizsegt
pavăzăscut
krytštítzakrývať
ščitzaščititi
sköldskydda
โล่
kalkankorumakşiltgözlerden gizlemek
cái khiên

shield

[ʃiːld]
A. N
1. (armour, also Her) → escudo m (Tech) (on machine etc) → blindaje m, capa f protectora
2. (US) (= badge) [of policeman] → placa f
B. VTproteger
to shield sb from sthproteger a algn de algo
to shield one's eyestaparse los ojos

shield

[ˈʃiːld]
n
[soldier, warrior] → bouclier m
(also riot shield) → bouclier m antiémeute
(= protection) → protection f, écran m
a shield against the sun → un écran contre le soleil
He used his left hand as a shield against the reflecting sunlight
BUT Il se servit de sa main gauche pour protéger ses yeux de la lumière du soleil. human shield
(= screen) (on machine)écran m de protection
a heat shield → un bouclier thermique
(= trophy) → trophée m
(US) (= police badge) insigne en forme de bouclier porté par les officiers de police américains
(HERALDRY)écu m, écusson m
vt
(= protect) → protéger
to shield sb from sth → protéger qn de qch, protéger qn contre qch
(= shade) [+ eyes] → protéger du soleil

shield

n (Mil, Her) → Schild m; (Zool also) → Panzer m; (= sporting trophy also)Trophäe f; (on machine) → Schutzschirm or -schild m; (= eyeshield, radiation shield)Schirm m; (fig)Schutz m; riot shieldSchutzschild m; God is our shieldGott ist unser Schild
vtschützen (→ sb from sth jdn vor etw dat); industryabsichern, abschirmen; she tried to shield him from the truthsie versuchte, ihm die Wahrheit zu ersparen

shield

[ʃiːld]
1. n (armour) → scudo; (on machine) → schermo (di protezione)
2. vt to shield sb from sthriparare qn da qc
to shield sb with one's body → fare scudo a qn con il proprio corpo

shield

(ʃiːld) noun
1. a broad piece of metal, wood etc carried as a protection against weapons.
2. something or someone that protects. A thick steel plate acted as a heat shield.
3. a trophy shaped like a shield won in a sporting competition etc. My son has won the archery shield.
verb
(often with from).
1. to protect. The goggles shielded the motorcyclist's eyes from dust.
2. to prevent from being seen clearly. That group of trees shields the house from the road.

shield

تُرْس štít skjold Schild ασπίδα escudo kilpi bouclier štit scudo 방패 schild skjold tarcza escudo щит sköld โล่ kalkan cái khiên

shield

n. escudo, cubierta.
References in classic literature ?
314-317) And round the rim Ocean was flowing, with a full stream as it seemed, and enclosed all the cunning work of the shield. Over it swans were soaring and calling loudly, and many others were swimming upon the surface of the water; and near them were shoals of fish.
318-326) A wonderful thing the great strong shield was to see -- even for Zeus the loud-thunderer, by whose will Hephaestus made it and fitted it with his hands.
But no; with a quick upward movement of the left arm Sir Henry interposed his shield between himself and the axe, with the result that its outer edge was shorn away, the axe falling on his left shoulder, but not heavily enough to do any serious damage.
Presently Sir Henry, having caught a fresh stroke upon his shield, hit out with all his force.
mon gar., it is very well when you do but shoot at a shield, but when there is a man behind the shield, and he rides at you with wave of sword and glint of eyes from behind his vizor, you may find him a less easy mark."
"That knight whom thou seest yonder in yellow armour, who bears upon his shield a lion crowned crouching at the feet of a damsel, is the valiant Laurcalco, lord of the Silver Bridge; that one in armour with flowers of gold, who bears on his shield three crowns argent on an azure field, is the dreaded Micocolembo, grand duke of Quirocia; that other of gigantic frame, on his right hand, is the ever dauntless Brandabarbaran de Boliche, lord of the three Arabias, who for armour wears that serpent skin, and has for shield a gate which, according to tradition, is one of those of the temple that Samson brought to the ground when by his death he revenged himself upon his enemies.
{166} The suitors were in an uproar when they saw that a man had been hit; they sprang in dismay one and all of them from their seats and looked everywhere towards the walls, but there was neither shield nor spear, and they rebuked Ulysses very angrily.
First he greaved his legs with greaves of good make and fitted with ancle-clasps of silver; after this he donned the cuirass of his brother Lycaon, and fitted it to his own body; he hung his silver-studded sword of bronze about his shoulders, and then his mighty shield. On his comely head he set his helmet, well-wrought, with a crest of horse-hair that nodded menacingly above it, and he grasped a redoubtable spear that suited his hands.
Secondly, any knight proposing to combat, might, if he pleased, select a special antagonist from among the challengers, by touching his shield. If he did so with the reverse of his lance, the trial of skill was made with what were called the arms of courtesy, that is, with lances at whose extremity a piece of round flat board was fixed, so that no danger was encountered, save from the shock of the horses and riders.
And then was Sir Gawaine ware how there hung a white shield on that tree, and ever as the damsels came by it they spit upon it, and some threw mire upon the shield --"
arise, chief of the dark brown shields! I see the dark, the mountain stream of battle.
Up over the shoulder of the hill came the sun of Slaughter; it glowed red upon the red shields, red grew the place of killing; the white plumes of the chiefs were dipped in the blood of heaven.