shillaber


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shillaber

(ˈʃɪləbə)
n
a shill or someone who poses as a satisfied customer in order to encourage other buyers or participants
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Quality service to internal customers results in empowered and happy colleagues who are likely to carry out their own work more effectively (Azzolini & Shillaber, 1993).
Elsewhere Archibald Henderson has quoted Twain comparing himself to some of the many other platform humorists with whom he competed for historical legacy: "I succeeded in the long run, where Shillaber, Doesticks, and Billings failed, because they never had an ideal higher than that of merely being funny" (99).
After being shown the animated trailer, hearing the theme tune and listening to the story behind the show, the children were given the opportunity to create their own pasty, an opportunity they relished according to head teacher David Shillaber.
Internal quality initiatives include developing effective internal information and communication systems, providing comprehensive training programs, requiring regular meetings across functional areas, implementing internal service quality-oriented performance measurement systems, surveying internal customers, and developing cross-functional teams (Azzolini and Shillaber 1993; Handfield and Ghosh 1994; and Tucker, Meyer, and Westerman 1996).
The provision of exceptional service to external customers relies upon cooperation and internal service among contact employees and other employees of the firm (Azzolini and Shillaber, 1993).
The popular humorists of the midcentury, such as Benjamin Shillaber (1814-1890), who created MRS.
The female counterpart of the Yankee was created by <IR> BENJAMIN SHILLABER </IR> in the Life and Sayings of Mrs.
SHILLABER </IR> took over the name, called his character Mrs.
Shillaber wrote an account of his life in the New England Magazine (June 1893-May 1894).
Showing of their honors--a framed pastel drawing of an abstract landscape by Plymouth State University professor Bill Haust--are, from left: Byron Champlin, Chuck Cornelio and Sandi Kemmish of Lincoln Financial Group; Ben Anderson, Tumbledown Farms; Charles Head and Scott Shillaber, Sanborn Head & Associates; Sam Laverack of Meredith Village Savings Bank; and Scott Rice of the Woodstock Inn.