shireman

shireman

(ˈʃaɪəmən)
n, pl -men
a sheriffa person who lives in the shires, esp East Anglia, Kent, Sussex, Essex, and Surrey
References in periodicals archive ?
Crystal Lake South Stewart 68, Lyschynsky 80, Falbo 81, Wiggs 83, Shireman 89, Roberts 93.
Kirk Shireman, International Space Station program manager
As the need for gastroenterology services grew in the early 1990s, Bookman joined Richard Welch, Danny Smith, Tom Shireman and Mark Mellow to start Digestive Disease Specialists Inc.
Still, as at-risk nonprofit institutions consider mergers and closures, Mount Ida's situation remains an isolated event, says Robert Shireman, senior fellow of The Century Foundation, a progressive nonpartisan think tank.
It was a ravenous model, said Bob Shireman, a senior fellow at the Century Foundation and former U.S.
Around this time, some guarantee agencies, perhaps panicked about their cash flow drying up if Clinton's plan succeeded, took on what Bob Shireman, a major figure in the campaign for Direct Loans, calls "a business venture mentality." The biggest player was Sallie Mae: By the time it became independent of the federal government in 2004, it was making profits of almost $2 billion a year, selling loans in bundles on Wall Street, and giving out private loans outside the federal system at rates of more than 20 percent in some cases.
In a medical emergency, no one will want to wait 20 minutes for a call for help to reach Earth and then another 20 minutes for advice to get back to the stricken crew, said NASA's space station program manager Kirk Shireman. An AI companion could provide instant assistance.
"The first person who will set foot on Mars has already been born and is probably in school right now," says Rebecca Shireman, a spokesperson at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Titusville, Florida.
Shireman, "Impact of a modified data capture period on Liu comorbidity index scores in Medicare enrollees initiating chronic dialysis," BMC Nephrology, vol.
Casi de manera unanime, los estudios clinicos disponibles desestiman que las familias adoptivas monoparentales representen un mayor factor de riesgo para el proceso adoptivo, y, por el contrario, sus hallazgos evidencian que estas adoptantes viven experiencias de crianza sustancialmente similares a las de parejas de adoptantes (Feigelman y Silverman 1977; Shireman y Johnson 1985), sus problematicas no difieren de lo que pueda presentarse en una adopcion matrimonial (Argemi Renom 2005; Tan y Baggerly 2009), y tienden a tener el mismo exito que las parejas en su desempeno parental (Feigelman y Silverman 1977; Groze 1991; Pakizegi 2007).