schmatte

(redirected from shmattes)

schmat·te

 (shmä′tə)
n.
1. A rag.
2. An old or ragged garment.

[Yiddish shmate, from Polish szmata.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I'll live in the diaspora and sell all kinds of shmattes, souvenirs from the secular Zion, remnants of the city that rose from sand and to sand returned.
Leivick's Rags (Shmattes in Yiddish), and it premiered at Schwartz's Yiddish Art Theater in December 1921.
The headline read "Coughers, Kvetchers and Other Stars in the Seats." Other dillies include "The Muse Who Sold Shmattes" (about Ron Rifkin), "Shaking Things Up in Broadway's Shtetl" and a dance review which read "A Mishmash of 2 Forms." Back in the 2005-6 season a review of an LA opera headlined "Shlemiel!
Salt Fish & Shmattes: A History of the Jews in Newfoundland and Labrador from 1770.
Although it belongs to the standard vocabulary of American Yiddish, shmatte is actually derived from the Polish word szmata (a "rag," or piece of cloth).