shonky

shonky

(ˈʃɒŋkɪ)
adj, -kier or -kiest
1. of dubious integrity or legality
2. unreliable; unsound
[C19: perhaps from Yiddish shonniker or from sh(oddy) + (w)onky]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
The pavements are strewn with cunning hazards, like those skew-whiff cracks that mysteriously appear overnight to trip the unwary and my personal favourite, the shonky flagstone that looks as solid as the Bank of England, until you stand on it, when it suddenly wallops down on one side and flings you over like a judo master.
Each time I opened the shonky bathroom door, the wrought-iron latch had to be fought against.
Two teams race about a shonky set completing challenges, overseen by an unlikely host.
"Absolutely shonky," one critic wrote on the group's Facebook page.
Until January 14 Shonky: The Aesthetics of Awkwardness
Of course, not all car hire companies have such shonky policies.
The contest over the scale of production that counts as free-range became public in 2008 when consumer organisation Choice gave the AECL a 'Shonky Award' for its definition of free-range with the comment that
These are laws which, whatever serious issues they are meant to tackle, are bad laws, shonky, jerry-built, unworkable.
Throughout the latter part of the nineteenth century there were occasional attempts to counter what one hard-headed rationalist described as "the romance clinging to all things oriental." (31) However, even among those not taken in by fake fakirs and shonky spiritualists, or attracted to sensuality and ornamentalism, the East remained a source of fascination and wonder.
Huggard said there had been significant opposition to it on many grounds, and among Maori and the public, who didn't want the New Zealand Government to be sued in "shonky offshore tribunals" for making decisions in the public interest.