shooting star


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shooting star

n.
1. See meteor.
2. Any of several North American perennial herbs of the genus Dodecatheon, having nodding flowers with reflexed petals.

shooting star

n
(Astronomy) an informal name for meteor

shoot′ing star′


n.
2. any North American plant of the genus Dodecatheon, of the primrose family, esp. D.meadia, having pink or white flowers.
[1585–95]

shoot·ing star

(sho͞o′tĭng)
See meteor.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shooting star - a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth's atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explodeshooting star - a streak of light in the sky at night that results when a meteoroid hits the earth's atmosphere and air friction causes the meteoroid to melt or vaporize or explode
light, visible light, visible radiation - (physics) electromagnetic radiation that can produce a visual sensation; "the light was filtered through a soft glass window"
bolide, fireball - an especially luminous meteor (sometimes exploding)
meteor shower, meteor stream - a transient shower of meteors when a meteor swarm enters the earth's atmosphere
Translations
falstelo
tähdenlento
hullócsillag
estrela cadente

shooting star

nstella cadente
References in classic literature ?
But very early in the morning poor Ogilvy, who had seen the shooting star and who was persuaded that a meteorite lay somewhere on the common between Horsell, Ottershaw, and Woking, rose early with the idea of finding it.
At night she carried a tiny lantern, so they should not miss her in the dark; and the people on the other ships that passed said that the light must be a shooting star.
How he loves the bravo of Chao with his sabre from the Chinese Sheffield of Wu, "with the surface smooth as ice and dazzling as snow, with his saddle broidered with silver upon his white steed; who when he passes, swift as the wind, may be said to resemble a shooting star!" He compares the frontiersman, who has never so much as opened a book in all his life, yet knows how to follow in the chase, and is skilful, strong, and hardy, with the men of his own profession.
"I wonder whether it's a shooting star," remarked Miss Dorn.
Darling screamed, this time in distress for him, for she thought he was killed, and she ran down into the street to look for his little body, but it was not there; and she looked up, and in the black night she could see nothing but what she thought was a shooting star.
"What about quotation marks?" said the priest, and flung his cigar far into the darkness like a shooting star.
While the travelers were trying to pierce the profound darkness, a brilliant cluster of shooting stars burst upon their eyes.
True, he had beheld shooting stars (this in reply to Bassett's contention); but likewise had he beheld the phosphorescence of fungoid growths and rotten meat and fireflies on dark nights, and the flames of wood- fires and of blazing candle-nuts; yet what were flame and blaze and glow when they had flamed and blazed and glowed?
But now Philip added other means of attaining his desire: he began to wish, when he saw a new moon or a dappled horse, and he looked out for shooting stars; during exeat they had a chicken at the vicarage, and he broke the lucky bone with Aunt Louisa and wished again, each time that his foot might be made whole.
Now there is a sound of putting up shop- shutters in the court and a smell as of the smoking of pipes; and shooting stars are seen in upper windows, further indicating retirement to rest.
Unmindful of the tedious rope-ladders of the shrouds, the men, like shooting stars, slid to the deck, by the isolated back-stays and halyards; while Ahab, less dartingly, but still rapidly was dropped from his perch.
He would delight them equally by his anecdotes of witchcraft, and of the direful omens and portentous sights and sounds in the air, which prevailed in the earlier times of Connecticut; and would frighten them woefully with speculations upon comets and shooting stars; and with the alarming fact that the world did absolutely turn round, and that they were half the time topsy-turvy!