shorefront


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shore·front

 (shôr′frŭnt′)
n.
Land situated on the edge of a body of water.

shorefront

(ˈʃɔːˌfrʌnt)
n
(Physical Geography) the area on the edge of a body of water
References in periodicals archive ?
15 from their capsized boat along a Japan shorefront.
Outside there will be a double garage to accompany the existing greenhouse and the rear garden runs down to the shorefront with private access to the beach.
Its redneck residents specialise in hustling tourists for cash so a suave city slicker who seems keen to invest in shorefront businesses sets alarm bells ringing.
89) Similarly, courts have sustained statutes giving the public a right to cross beachfront land without compensating the shorefront owner, on the ground that, even before enactment of the statute, state law created a public right to use the beachfront land.
Dino Robinson, founder and director of Shorefront in Evanston, 111.
Inspired by the area's shipbuilding past, the oxidized metal panels are a nod to the scrap metal piles once lining the area's shorefront.
Over the past 3 years weve already funded more than 200 projects along the shorefront from piers and promenades to shop-fronts and sailing centres to attract tourists, boost jobs and create vibrant local economies.
Results of this study investigating the major drivers of coastal hazards and the severity of hazard exposure along the Iqaluit waterfront suggest limited risk for much of the shorefront infrastructure.
A video streamed real-life footage of the grey whale that swam into False Creek in 2010, drawing throngs of citizens to the shorefront to catch a glimpse, later commemorated with a new poem by Brad Cran: Thirteen tVoys of Looking at a Gray Whale, After Wallace Stevens and ending with a line from Rilke.
Julie, 50, who was accompanied on the shorefront by her daughter Paula and granddaughter Macey, said: "I thought the Lib Dems would be fair and for the people.