shorter


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short

 (shôrt)
adj. short·er, short·est
1. Having little length; not long.
2. Having little height; not tall.
3. Extending or traveling not far or not far enough: a short toss.
4.
a. Lasting a brief time: a short holiday.
b. Appearing to pass quickly: finished the job in a few short months.
5. Not lengthy; succinct: short and to the point.
6.
a. Rudely brief; abrupt: The owner was quite short with the new hire.
b. Easily provoked; irascible: has a short temper.
7. Inadequate; insufficient: oil in short supply; were short on experience.
8. Lacking in length or amount: a board that is short two inches.
9. Lacking in breadth or scope: a short view of the problem.
10. Deficient in retentiveness: a short memory.
11.
a. Holding a trading position that is inversely related to the price of a security or index: short investors; an investor who is short gold.
b. Of or relating to a short sale: a short position.
12.
a. Containing a large amount of shortening; flaky: a short pie crust.
b. Not ductile; brittle: short iron.
13.
a. Linguistics Of, relating to, or being a speech sound of relatively brief duration, as the first vowel sound in the Latin word mălus, "evil," as compared with the same or a similar sound of relatively long duration, as the first vowel sound in the Latin word mālus, "apple tree."
b. Grammar Of, relating to, or being a vowel sound in English, such as the vowel sound (ă) in pat or (o͝o) in put, that is descended from a vowel of brief duration.
14. Being of relatively brief duration. Used of a syllable in quantitative prosody.
15. Slang Close to the end of a tour of military duty.
adv. shorter, shortest
1. Abruptly; quickly: stop short.
2. In a rude or curt manner.
3. At a point before a given boundary, limit, or goal: a missile that landed short of the target.
4. At a disadvantage: We were caught short by the sudden storm.
5. By means of a short sale: selling a commodity short.
n.
1. Something short, as:
a. Linguistics A short syllable, vowel, or consonant.
b. A brief film; a short subject.
c. A size of clothing less long than the average for that size.
d. shorts Short pants extending to the knee or above.
e. shorts Undershorts.
2.
a. A short sale.
b. One that sells short.
3. shorts A byproduct of wheat processing that consists of germ, bran, and coarse meal or flour.
4. shorts Clippings or trimmings that remain as byproducts in various manufacturing processes, often used to make an inferior variety of the product.
5.
a. A short circuit.
b. A malfunction caused by a short circuit.
6. Baseball A shortstop.
v. short·ed, short·ing, shorts
v.tr.
1. To cause a short circuit in.
2. Informal To give (one) less than one is entitled to; shortchange.
3. To short-sell (a security or index).
v.intr.
To short-circuit.
Idioms:
for short
As an abbreviation: He's called Ed for short.
in short
In summary; briefly.
short for
An abbreviation of: Ed is short for Edward.
short of
1. Having an inadequate supply of: We're short of cash.
2. Less than: Nothing short of her best effort was required to make the team.
3. Other than; without resorting to: Short of yelling at him, I had no other way to catch his attention.
4. Not quite willing to undertake or do; just this side of: She stopped short of throwing out the old photo.
the short end of the stick
The worst side of an unequal deal.

[Middle English, from Old English sceort, scort; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]

short′ness n.

Shor·ter

 (shôr′tər), Wayne Born 1933.
American jazz saxophonist who was a leading figure in the hard bop and jazz rock movements.

shorter

  • store - A shortened version of the obsolete astor, "stock of provisions, supplies."
  • alligator - From Spanish el lagarto, "the lizard," which may have come from Latin lacerta; the alligator has a shorter, blunter snout than a crocodile.
  • telescopic umbrella - An umbrella that can become shorter.
  • dog watch - A two-hour watch on board a ship, it is based on dog sleep, the light or fitful sleep typical of dogs (a catnap being even shorter).
References in classic literature ?
It went faster and faster, and the shorter his money-sack grew, the shorter grew his temper.
This is a very bad Apollo," said the Sculptor: "the chest is too narrow, and one arm is at least a half-inch shorter than the other.
COSTLY followers are not to be liked; lest while a man maketh his train longer, he make his wings shorter.
It was noticed that his spinal column was crooked, his head seated on his shoulder blades, and that one leg was shorter than the other.
A pair of workman's brogans encased my feet, and for trousers I was furnished with a pair of pale blue, washed-out overalls, one leg of which was fully ten inches shorter than the other.
Read as many as time allows of his most important shorter poems.
Then it got down off the mushroom, and crawled away in the grass, merely remarking as it went, `One side will make you grow taller, and the other side will make you grow shorter.
He felt at ease in the midst of the most complete privations; in fine, he was the very type of the thoroughly accomplished explorer whose stomach expands or contracts at will; whose limbs grow longer or shorter according to the resting-place that each stage of a journey may bring; who can fall asleep at any hour of the day or awake at any hour of the night.
Indeed, that Cowper is remembered at all is due more to his shorter poems such as Boadicea and The Wreck of the Royal George, and chiefly, perhaps, to John Gilpin, which in its own way is a treasure that we would not be without.
You will be caught up much shorter, my good friend--infinitely shorter--one of these days, depend upon it,' replied his patron calmly.
Jeremy crossed his legs up shorter, out of reach, and went on eating his sandwich.
The shorter the way from the door of the prison to the foot of the scaffold, the more fully, of course, it was crowded with curious people.