shovel hat


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shovel hat

n.
A stiff, broad-brimmed, low-crowned hat, turned up at the sides and projecting in front, formerly worn chiefly by English clergymen.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shovel hat

n
(Clothing & Fashion) a black felt hat worn by some clergymen, with a brim rolled up to resemble a shovel in shape
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

shov′el hat`


n.
a hat with a shallow crown and a broad brim turned up at the sides, worn esp. by some clergymen.
[1825–35]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shovel hat - a stiff broad-brimmed hat with the brim turned up at the sides and projecting in frontshovel hat - a stiff broad-brimmed hat with the brim turned up at the sides and projecting in front; worn by some clergymen in Britain
chapeau, hat, lid - headdress that protects the head from bad weather; has shaped crown and usually a brim
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
And while the moralist, who is holding forth on the cover ( an accurate portrait of your humble servant), professes to wear neither gown nor bands, but only the very same long-eared livery in which his congregation is arrayed: yet, look you, one is bound to speak the truth as far as one knows it, whether one mounts a cap and bells or a shovel hat; and a deal of disagreeable matter must come out in the course of such an undertaking.
The Reverend Michael Millward himself was a tall, ponderous elderly gentleman, who placed a shovel hat above his large, square, massive-featured face, carried a stout walking-stick in his hand, and incased his still powerful limbs in knee-breeches and gaiters, - or black silk stockings on state occasions.
The red-faced shopman regarded him with an eye of menace; but he continued gaily, swinging his cane, "Why," he pursued, "why are two tickets wrongly placed in a greengrocer's shop like a shovel hat that has come to London for a holiday?