showy


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show·y

 (shō′ē)
adj. show·i·er, show·i·est
1. Making a striking or aesthetically pleasing display: showy flowers.
2. Marked by or given to extravagant, often tasteless display.

show′i·ly adv.
show′i·ness n.
Synonyms: showy, flamboyant, ostentatious, pretentious
These adjectives mean marked by a striking, often excessively conspicuous display: a showy rhinestone bracelet; an entertainer's flamboyant personality; an ostentatious sable coat; pretentious name-dropping.

showy

(ˈʃəʊɪ)
adj, showier or showiest
1. gaudy, flashy, or ostentatious
2. making a brilliant or imposing display
ˈshowily adv
ˈshowiness n

show•y

(ˈʃoʊ i)

adj. show•i•er, show•i•est.
1. making an imposing display: showy flowers.
2. pompous; ostentatious; gaudy.
[1705–15]
show′i•ly, adv.
show′i•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.showy - marked by ostentation but often tasteless; "a cheap showy rhinestone bracelet"; "a splashy half-page ad"
ostentatious, pretentious - intended to attract notice and impress others; "an ostentatious sable coat"
2.showy - displaying brilliance and virtuosity
theatrical - suited to or characteristic of the stage or theater; "a theatrical pose"; "one of the most theatrical figures in public life"
3.showy - (used especially of clothes) marked by conspicuous display
colourful, colorful - striking in variety and interest; "a colorful period of history"; "a colorful character"; "colorful language"
4.showy - superficially attractive and stylish; suggesting wealth or expense; "a glossy TV series"
attractive - pleasing to the eye or mind especially through beauty or charm; "a remarkably attractive young man"; "an attractive personality"; "attractive clothes"; "a book with attractive illustrations"

showy

adjective ostentatious, flamboyant, flashy, flash (informal), loud, over the top (informal), brash, pompous, pretentious, gaudy, garish, tawdry, splashy (informal), tinselly They were smart but not showy.
quiet, restrained, discreet, tasteful, unobtrusive, muted, subdued, low-key

showy

adjective
Marked by outward, often extravagant display:
Translations
مُبَهْرَج، مُزَوَّق إلى حَدٍ كبير
efektnínápadný
skrautlegur, áberandi; í æpandi litum

showy

[ˈʃəʊɪ] ADJ (showier (compar) (showiest (superl))) → ostentoso

showy

[ˈʃəʊi] adjtapageur/euse

showy

adj (+er)protzig (inf); personauffallend; (as regards clothes) → protzig angezogen (inf); mannertheatralisch; ceremony, décorbombastisch; colourgrell, auffällig; productionbombastisch, auf Schau (inf)or Effekte gemacht

showy

[ˈʃəʊɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) → vistoso/a, appariscente

show

(ʃəu) past tense showed: past participles showed ~shown verb
1. to allow or cause to be seen. Show me your new dress; Please show your membership card when you come to the club; His work is showing signs of improvement.
2. to be able to be seen. The tear in your dress hardly shows; a faint light showing through the curtains.
3. to offer or display, or to be offered or displayed, for the public to look at. Which picture is showing at the cinema?; They are showing a new film; His paintings are being shown at the art gallery.
4. to point out or point to. He showed me the road to take; Show me the man you saw yesterday.
5. (often with (a)round) to guide or conduct. Please show this lady to the door; They showed him (a)round (the factory).
6. to demonstrate to. Will you show me how to do it?; He showed me a clever trick.
7. to prove. That just shows / goes to show how stupid he is.
8. to give or offer (someone) kindness etc. He showed him no mercy.
noun
1. an entertainment, public exhibition, performance etc. a horse-show; a flower show; the new show at the theatre; a TV show.
2. a display or act of showing. a show of strength.
3. an act of pretending to be, do etc (something). He made a show of working, but he wasn't really concentrating.
4. appearance, impression. They just did it for show, in order to make themselves seem more important than they are.
5. an effort or attempt. He put up a good show in the chess competition.
ˈshowy adjective
giving an impression of value by a bright and striking outward appearance. His clothes are too showy for my liking.
ˈshowiness noun
ˈshow-business noun
the entertainment industry, especially the branch of the theatre concerned with variety shows, comedy etc.
ˈshowcase noun
a glass case for displaying objects in a museum, shop etc.
ˈshowdown noun
an open, decisive quarrel etc ending a period of rivalry etc.
ˈshowground noun
an area where displays etc are held.
ˈshow-jumping noun
a competitive sport in which horses and their riders have to jump a series of artificial fences, walls etc.
ˈshowman noun
a person who owns or manages an entertainment, a stall at a fair etc.
ˈshowroom noun
a room where objects for sale etc are displayed for people to see. a car showroom.
give the show away
to make known a secret, trick etc.
good show!
that's good!.
on show
being displayed in an exhibition, showroom etc. There are over five hundred paintings on show here.
show off
1. to show or display for admiration. He showed off his new car by taking it to work.
2. to try to impress others with one's possessions, ability etc. She is just showing off – she wants everyone to know how well she speaks French (noun ˈshow-off a person who does this).
show up
1. to make obvious. This light shows up the places where I've mended this coat.
2. to reveal the faults of. Mary was so neat that she really showed me up.
3. to stand out clearly. The scratches showed up on the photograph.
4. to appear or arrive. I waited for her, but she never showed up.
References in classic literature ?
Now thousands of feet and bayonets moved and halted at the officers' command, turned with banners flying, formed up at intervals, and wheeled round other similar masses of infantry in different uniforms; now was heard the rhythmic beat of hoofs and the jingling of showy cavalry in blue, red, and green braided uniforms, with smartly dressed bandsmen in front mounted on black, roan, or gray horses; then again, spreading out with the brazen clatter of the polished shining cannon that quivered on the gun carriages and with the smell of linstocks, came the artillery which crawled between the infantry and cavalry and took up its appointed position.
He scoffed at them as adventures, mountebanks, sideshow riffraff, dime museum freaks; he assailed their showy titles with measureless derision; he said they were back-alley barbers disguised as nobilities, peanut peddlers masquerading as gentlemen, organ-grinders bereft of their brother monkey.
At a certain corner he came to a standstill, proposing to himself the question of turning back toward the showy and fashionable restaurant in which he usually dined on the evenings of his especial luxury.
TOM joined the new order of Cadets of Temperance, being attracted by the showy character of their "regalia.
He was thinking of his own self; he hankered after the meretricious glory of a showy performance.
No showy arts Be mine, but teach me what the state requires.
In the manner of costumes and scenery it was fine and showy enough; but there was not much action.
Possibly, some people might suspect him of a degree of under-bred pride; I have a sympathetic chord within that tells me it is nothing of the sort: I know, by instinct, his reserve springs from an aversion to showy displays of feeling - to manifestations of mutual kindliness.
After he has gotten himself up regardless of expense, in showy, baggy trowsers, yellow, pointed slippers, fiery fez, silken jacket of blue, voluminous waist-sash of fancy Persian stuff filled with a battery of silver-mounted horse-pistols, and has strapped on his terrible scimitar, he considers it an unspeakable humiliation to be called Ferguson.
It cost twenty pounds, which was much more than he could afford, but it was showy and vulgar: he knew she would be aware exactly how much it cost; he got a melancholy satisfaction in choosing a gift which would give her pleasure and at the same time indicate for himself the contempt he had for her.
I saw the little world about me through the lenses of my master's spectacles, and I reported its facts, in his tone and his attitude, with his self-flattered scorn, his showy sighs, his facile satire.
Of the two parties who answered it, but one would consent to give me fifty pounds, the sum my mother bade me name as the salary I should require; and here, I hesitated about engaging myself, as I feared the children would be too old, and their parents would require some one more showy, or more experienced, if not more accomplished than I.