shrewmouse


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Related to shrewmouse: common shrew

shrew·mouse

 (shro͞o′mous′)
n. pl. shrew·mice (-mīs′)
See shrew.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

shrewmouse

(ˈʃruːˌmaʊs)
n, pl -mice
(Animals) another name for the shrew, esp the common shrew
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.shrewmouse - small mouselike mammal with a long snoutshrewmouse - small mouselike mammal with a long snout; related to moles
insectivore - small insect-eating mainly nocturnal terrestrial or fossorial mammals
common shrew, Sorex araneus - common American shrew
masked shrew, Sorex cinereus - commonest shrew of moist habitats in North America
Blarina brevicauda, short-tailed shrew - North American shrew with tail less than half its body length
water shrew - any of several small semiaquatic shrews usually living near swift-flowing streams
Cryptotis parva, least shrew - small brown shrew of grassy regions of eastern United States
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Tom Tulliver, being abundant in no form of speech, did not use any metaphor to declare his views as to the nature of Latin; he never called it an instrument of torture; and it was not until he had got on some way in the next half-year, and in the Delectus, that he was advanced enough to call it a "bore" and "beastly stuff." At present, in relation to this demand that he should learn Latin declensions and conjugations, Tom was in a state of as blank unimaginativeness concerning the cause and tendency of his sufferings, as if he had been an innocent shrewmouse imprisoned in the split trunk of an ash-tree in order to cure lameness in cattle.
Some animal species, the shrewmouse for example, eat more than their body weight in food per day.