shrub layer


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shrub layer

n
(Biology) See layer2
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Tony Lowes of the FIE said: "Machinery has devastated the shrub layer of the woodland, tearing up the ground and driving over trees with no regard to the wildlife."
"The shrub layer contains hazel, elder, hawthorn and natural regeneration of oak, aspen, birch and ash.
In the shrub layer, the main source of GHG emissions was waste transportation, which contributed 50% of the shrub layer's GHG emissions; in the grassland layer, the main source of GHG emissions was mowing, which contributed 56% of the GHG emissions.
(2012a) have shown that dormouse abundance in nest boxes increases as the shrub layer index increases; and Juskaitis & Siozinyte (2008), Juskaitis & Buchner (2013) indicate that high shrub density is deemed optimal habitat.
There's a canopy layer with a fruit tree -- in this case, an Asian pear -- as the tallest element, followed by a shrub layer, herbs, ground cover and roots.
In the shrub layer, average density and cover of shrubs was greater in 2013 than in 2002.
the revitalized area will serve as rest rooms strengthening the ecological stability of the urban environment with the representation of the tree and shrub layer mainly domestic species composition, with reference to the historical context, taking into account the current needs and operational relationships.
Using principal component analysis and canonical correspondence analysis methods, we determined that the size of trees with the height of shrub layer is an important criterion for differentiation of the avifauna of Boumezrane.
The shrub layer was < 2 m tall and usually consisted of brambles and other short growing plants.
The canopy layer is between 10 and 12 m tall, with a dense coverage (around 90%), while in the shrub layer it is almost always low (5 and 10%); seedlings, on the other hand, show an average coverage from 20 to 50%.
High cover of medium shrub species in the forest-tundra zone is likely related to increased tree patchiness and heterogeneity, which allow more light to the shrub layer while trees are still abundant enough to offer winter protection to shrubs by trapping snow.