shrubland


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shrub·land

 (shrŭb′lănd′)
n.
An area, such as chaparral, covered chiefly with shrubs and small trees.

shrubland

(ˈʃrʌbˌlænd)
n
(Physical Geography) land covered by shrubs
References in periodicals archive ?
Singing for the Brain takes place regularly at the Brunswick Healthy Living Centre in Shrubland Street, Leamington.
To do so, we first determined the diet of bobcats from two types of habitat, grassland and shrubland, within our study area in the Chihuahuan Desert of Mexico.
After degradation into patchy shrubland habitats, however, the efficiency of runoff flow concentration on hillslopes is reduced (Wilcox et al.
Scientists from Simon Fraser University, Canada, investigated the DNA of Timema stick insects, which live in shrubland around the west coast of the US.
"The fires are happening hundreds of yards away from the road and over waste and shrubland. This means that we have to park up a long way from the small fires and pull out the reels and use the water on the machine.
Fine furniture and works of art are coming up for auction as part of the sale of Shrubland Hall in Suffolk.
By the time I arrived at Shrubland, six hours into my diet, my stomach was rumbling so loudly the lady on reception must have thought a thunderstorm was brewing.
Postfire woody vegetation recovery and soil properties in blackbrush (Coleogyne ramosissima Torr.) shrubland ecotones.
THE RSPCA is investigating after the body of a dog was discovered left in a plastic bag on a stretch of open shrubland in east Cleveland.
Tenders are invited for contract for the supply of shrubland, livestock, aquatic plants, vineyards, roses, crasses, cacti, palmacles of small port, interior, bulbs, seeds and tepes of lawns, autochthonous seeds and sacks of flowers with measures of sustainable public procurement
While the fuel landscape between the two fires differs significantly, with heavy forestry characterizing the Camp Fire (Northern California) and shrubland in the Woolsey Fire (Southern California), both developed under dangerous conditions that favor quick fire spread: low moisture, abnormally high temperatures, dry vegetation and intense seasonal winds.
Some of these changes are already under way in the southwestern United States, where massive wildfires are destroying pine forests and transforming swaths of territory into shrubland.