siamang

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Related to siamangs: Hylobates syndactylus, Hylobatidae

si·a·mang

 (sē′ə-măng′, sē-ăm′əng)
n.
A large black gibbon (Hylobates syndactylus syn. Symphalangus syndactylus) of Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula, having an inflatable throat sac and a web of skin joining the second and third toes.

[Malay.]

siamang

(ˈsaɪəˌmæŋ)
n
(Animals) a large black gibbon, Hylobates (or Symphalangus) syndactylus, of Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula, having a large reddish-brown vocal sac beneath the chin and the second and third toes united
[C19: from Malay]

si•a•mang

(ˈsi əˌmæŋ)

n.
a large black gibbon, Symphalangus (Hylobates) syndactylus, of Sumatra and the Malay Peninsula.
[1815–25; < Malay]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.siamang - large black gibbon of Sumatra having the 2nd and 3rd toes partially united by a websiamang - large black gibbon of Sumatra having the 2nd and 3rd toes partially united by a web
lesser ape - gibbons and siamangs
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
The original FACS was developed for use in humans (Ekman and Rosenberg, 2005), and this framework has since been applied to a number of different nonhuman primates and domesticated species, i.e., chimpanzees (Vick et al., 2007), orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus, Caeiro et al., 2012), rhesus macaques (Parr et al., 2010), gibbons and siamangs (Hylobatidae, Waller et al., 2012), horses (Wathan et al., 2015), dogs (Waller et al., 2013) and cats (Caeiro et al., 2013).
It may not be related to the ancestor of all living apes--a group split into small-bodied apes (gibbons and siamangs) and large-bodied apes (chimps, gorillas and orangutans).
Twycross Zoo is home to four different species of gibbon: agile gibbons, pileated gibbons and siamangs, as well as northern white cheeked gibbons.
While some scholars suggest a functional role of male protection against infanticide in gibbons and siamangs (van Schaik & Dunbar, 1990), alternative interpretations of male-female socially monogamous bonds in these species emphasize food defense and mate guarding (Reichard & Boesch, eds., 2005).