sibling species


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sibling species

n.
Any of two or more species that are very similar morphologically.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The house mouse (Mus musculus, Linnaeus, 1758) and mound-building mouse (Mus spicilegus, Petenyi, 1882) are two sibling species of the genus Mus distributed in Slovakia (Kristofik & Danko 2003a, b, Kristofik 2012, Kristofik & Stollmann 2012).
Rapid assays for identification of members of the Culex (Culex) pipiens complex, their hybrids, and other sibling species (Diptera: culicidae).
Especially, the sibling species of the Paramecium aurelia complex have been intensively studied because of their complex genomics and as an example of species radiation (Coleman, 2005; Aury et al., 2006; Hori et al., 2006; Przybos et al., 2008; McGrath et al., 2014).
Characterization of the orchid bee Euglossa viridissima (Apidae: Euglossini) and a novel cryptic sibling species, by morphological, chemical, and genetic characters.
Uehara and S.M.Rahman(2002).Effects of egg size on fertilization, fecundity and offspring performance: A comparative study between two sibling species of tropical sea urchins (genus Echinometra).
Ecological speciation has been demonstrated in numerous shallow-water marine invertebrates, with a divergence in life history being the most conspicuous difference between sibling species [7].
In this section we first examine the possible role of reproductive interference in the ecology of two sibling species (i.e., reproductively isolated species that are nearly identical in their appearance [25]) of the lacewings (Neuroptera: Chrysopidae) in North America, one in genus Chrysopa and another in Chrysoperla.
They discuss understanding skin color variation as an adaptation by detecting gene-environment interactions; information theoretic methods for analyzing gene-environment interactions; approaches for gene-environment interaction analysis: the practice of regional epidemiological study; using bioinformatics in revealing the identity of nature's products with minimum genetic variation: the sibling species; and integrating bioinformatics, biostatistics, and molecular epidemiological approaches to study how the environment and genes work together to influence the development of complex chronic diseases.
This paucity of attention on the little brown bat is inversely reflected when compared to the endangered Indiana bat (Myotis sodalis), a sibling species that has been at the relative center of North American bat ecologists' attention over the past few decades (e.g., Gardner et al, 1991; Kurta et al., 1993; Kurta et al, 1996; Kurta et al., 2002; Callahan et al., 1997; Britzke et al., 2003; Menzel et al., 2001; Carter and Feldhamer, 2005; Timpone et al., 2010).
formosa (from the mussel Pyganodon cataracta) or its sibling species U.