sibylline


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Related to sibylline: Sibylline Books, Sibylline oracles

sib·yl·line

 (sĭb′ə-līn′, -lēn′) also si·byl·ic or si·byl·lic (sĭ-bĭl′ĭk)
adj.
1. Coming from, characteristic of, or relating to a sibyl.
2. Prophetic; oracular.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecysibylline - resembling or characteristic of a prophet or prophecy; "the high priest's divinatory pronouncement"; "mantic powers"; "a kind of sibylline book with ready and infallible answers to questions"
prophetic, prophetical - foretelling events as if by supernatural intervention; "prophetic writings"; "prophetic powers"; "words that proved prophetic"
2.sibylline - having a secret or hidden meaning; "cabalistic symbols engraved in stone"; "cryptic writings"; "thoroughly sibylline in most of his pronouncements"- John Gunther
esoteric - confined to and understandable by only an enlightened inner circle; "a compilation of esoteric philosophical theories"

sibylline

adjective
Of or relating to the foretelling of events by or as if by supernatural means:
Translations
helderziendsibillijns

sibylline

[ˈsɪbɪlaɪn] ADJsibilino

sibylline

adj (lit)sibyllinisch; (fig)prophetisch
References in periodicals archive ?
"Sibylline Leaves: Mary Shelley's Valperga and the Legacy of Corinne." In Cultural Interactions in the Romantic Age, edited by Gregory Maertz, 157-73.
A classic example would be Fiona McIntosh's Trinity trilogy (2001-2), where a vague prophecy about the Trinity--all the most powerful prophecies are vague: see under "Sibylline"--is the core of the plot.
This year, FNAC is set to host notable authors especially invited by FNAC International, France, including Sibylline Desmazieres and Jerome D'Aviau, authors and illustrators of the book 'Rat et les animauxmoches' who interacted with students during their workshops.
The volume also features a transcription of the Brownings' address book from 1856-1863 and a sketch entitled "A Sibylline Trio," by Mary Burnet Kinney, a recollection of an evening in which Mary Somerville and Harriet Beecher Stowe sat and conversed with Elizabeth Barrett Browning (pp.
It was well attended with audience including representatives from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, think tanks and business organisations including the City of London Corporation, London Chamber of Commerce and Industry, British South India Council of Commerce and Sibylline Ltd.
This is Prajnakaragupta's interpretation of Dharmakirti's somewhat sibylline statement concerning the distinction between universals and illusory objects such as floaters.
The Court of Justice, with a rather sibylline explanation, did not rule on the applicability of arbitration agreements.
While the two oddly coupled bodies--one reified, the other radically unresolved--make a sibylline statement about the racialization of color and the patchwork character of identity, the title evokes a short poem by an aging Marsden Hartley: "The earth is all I know of wonder.
(30.) The Sibyl's loom in the Sibylline prophecy, as recorded
3-4, 3:3-5; CD-AI, 12-19; Sibylline Oracles 5:447-482; 4 Ezra 8:50; et al.
"Sibylline" quoted above, that a fraud may be afoot.
Coleridge's Sibylline Leaves included both his "Hymn Before Sunrise," which had not previously appeared in book form, and a revised version of "The Rime of the Ancient Mariner," in which the famous gloss (that is, the explanatory marginal comments) appeared for the first time.