sick call

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sick call

n.
1. A daily lineup of military personnel requiring medical attention.
2. A signal announcing the time for such a lineup.

sick′ call`



n.
1. a military formation for those requiring medical attention.
2. the period during which this formation is held.
[1830–40]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sick call - the daily military formation at which individuals report to the medical officer as sick
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
military formation - a formation of troops
References in classic literature ?
Susan had been up to the Glen to make a sick call, and had just returned.
The unanimous ruling from a three-judge panel blocks the Union from continuing to engage in improper activities such as excessive sick calls on short notice or refusing to work overtime.
Firefighters hope to raise enough money to buy another automatic CPR device paramedics use when responding to traffic accidents and sick calls.
I have done a lot of sick calls in my 37 years of priestly ministry.
From kids I visit in school to older people on sick calls, they're all behind it.''
Mooney further said that when the weather was good, more suspicious sick calls were likely to be received.( ANI )
Many sick calls in me summer of 1939 are fresh in my memory.
Apparently, they can still make sick calls. This appears to be an example of unintended consequences.
WORCESTER - The Worcester Regional Transit Authority buses were running on schedule yesterday, a day after service was slowed by a run of driver sick calls that officials said was a work action.
TARGET: Ross, main picture, and Brand made sick calls to Sachs on the show, above
PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA'S PROPOSAL to open a diplomatic dialogue with Iran, despite the initial lukewarm response of Iran's leaders, could signal a momentous change in what Gary Sick calls "the poisonous domestic political climates in both Tehran and Washington." But, Sick cautions, "Iran is neither the most dangerous nor the most pressing problem to be faced by the new administration" in the region.