sickliness


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Related to sickliness: silliness

sick·ly

 (sĭk′lē)
adj. sick·li·er, sick·li·est
1. Prone to sickness.
2. Of, caused by, or associated with sickness: a sickly pallor.
3. Conducive to sickness: a sickly climate.
4. Causing nausea; nauseating.
5. Lacking vigor or strength; feeble or weak: a sickly handshake.
tr.v. sick·lied, sick·ly·ing, sick·lies
Archaic To make sickly.

sick′li·ness n.
sick′ly, sick′li·ly adv.
Translations

sickliness

[ˈsɪklɪnɪs] N
1. (= ill health, feebleness) → lo enfermizo; (= paleness) → palidez f; (= weakness) → debilidad f
2. (= sweetness) → lo empalagoso

sickliness

n (of person, appearance)Kränklichkeit f; (of complexion, light)Blässe f; (of smell, taste, food, sentimentality, colour)Widerlichkeit f, → Ekelhaftigkeit f; (of smile)Mattheit f; (of grin)Schwachheit f

sickliness

[ˈsɪklɪnɪs] n (of person) → salute f malferma; (of cake, sweet) → sapore m stucchevole
References in classic literature ?
He could be heard getting up hurriedly, stumbling against something, and Levin saw, facing him in the doorway, the big, scared eyes, and the huge, thin, stooping figure of his brother, so familiar, and yet astonishing in it weirdness and sickliness.
He was a great walker, and thought nothing of going twenty or thirty miles a day, for though he was small and slight he had quite recovered from his childish sickliness and was full of wiry energy.
And within a year of their marriage she developed the "sickliness" which had since made her notable even in a community rich in pathological instances.
Foul and filthy as the room is, foul and filthy as the air is, it is not easy to perceive what fumes those are which most oppress the senses in it; but through the general sickliness and faintness, and the odour of stale tobacco, there comes into the lawyer's mouth the bitter, vapid taste of opium.
If some of my pupils chose to walk and take me with them, it was well for me; for otherwise my position in the carriage was to be crushed into the corner farthest from the open window, and with my back to the horses: a position which invariably made me sick; and if I were not actually obliged to leave the church in the middle of the service, my devotions were disturbed with a feeling of languor and sickliness, and the tormenting fear of its becoming worse: and a depressing headache was generally my companion throughout the day, which would otherwise have been one of welcome rest, and holy, calm enjoyment.
The powers of Hyde seemed to have grown with the sickliness of Jekyll.
She was young but her pale skin had the grey pallor of sickliness, her hooded eyes surrounded by dark circles.
Throughout much of 1891-92, people taking part in the Tobacco Protest attributed what they considered the central government's misguided policies to the mental degeneration or sickliness of key decision makers in Tehran.
Scholarly attention has been paid to Garrick's real sickliness, documented in George W.
She said lack of food was a constant problem 'despite the official pronouncements of authorities,' leading to the sickliness of children.
(17) Sanditon describes economies as well as people in terms of their health or sickliness, with Mr.
In the Victorian era in particular, female sickliness offered a way to "temporarily escape from the family duties, imposed by the cult of true womanhood" (Vandereycken and Deth 1994, 202).