sickle

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sickle

sick·le

 (sĭk′əl)
n.
1. An implement having a crescent-shaped blade attached to a short handle, used for cutting grain or tall grass.
2. The cutting mechanism of a reaper or mower.
v. sick·led, sick·ling, sick·les
v.tr.
1. To cut with a sickle.
2. To deform (a red blood cell) into an abnormal crescent shape.
v.intr.
To assume an abnormal crescent shape. Used of red blood cells.
adj.
Shaped like the blade of a sickle; crescent-shaped: a sickle moon.

[Middle English sikel, from Old English sicol, from Vulgar Latin sicila, from Latin sēcula; see sek- in Indo-European roots.]

sickle

(ˈsɪkəl)
n
(Tools) an implement for cutting grass, corn, etc, having a curved blade and a short handle
[Old English sicol, from Latin sēcula; related to secāre to cut]

sick•le

(ˈsɪk əl)

n.
1. an implement for cutting grain, grass, etc., consisting of a curved, hooklike blade mounted in a short handle.
2. (cap.) a group of stars in the constellation Leo, likened to this implement in formation.
[before 1000; Middle English sikel, Old English sicol, c. Middle Low German, Middle Dutch sekele, Old High German sichila, all « Latin secula=sec(āre) to cut + -ula -ule]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sickle - an edge tool for cutting grass or cropssickle - an edge tool for cutting grass or crops; has a curved blade and a short handle
edge tool - any cutting tool with a sharp cutting edge (as a chisel or knife or plane or gouge)
haft, helve - the handle of a weapon or tool
Translations
مِنْجَل
srp
segl
sarló
sigî
pjautuvas
sirpis
kosák
skära

sickle

[ˈsɪkl] Nhoz f

sickle

[ˈsɪkəl] n (= tool) → faucille f
the hammer and sickle → la faucille et le marteausick leave ncongé m de maladie, congé m maladie
on sick leave → en congé de maladie, en congé maladiesickle-cell anaemia nanémie f à hématies falciformes, drépanocytose f

sickle

nSichel f

sickle

[ˈsɪkl] nfalcetto
hammer and sickle → falce e martello

sickle

(ˈsikl) noun
a tool with a curved blade for cutting grain etc.
References in periodicals archive ?
GBTs health care professional-focused disease awareness campaign, SCD Silent Damage, seeks to increase attention among physicians regarding hemoglobin polymerization, the molecular basis of SCD that initiates the sickling of red blood cells and the ensuing cascade of clinical complications that drive high levels of morbidity and mortality in patients.
Pre-clinical data demonstrate IMR-687 reduces both the sickling of red blood cells and blood vessel occlusion that cause debilitating pain, organ damage, and early mortality in affected patients.
The present study determines the full blood count, sickling test and haemoglobin electrophoresis in sickle cell disease and sickle cell trait in Heglig area and the morphological features of sickle cell trait and sickle cell disease.
By doing so it may help reduce oxidative damage to red blood cells, thereby preventing the damage caused by red blood cell sickling.4
Phenotypic tests include sickling test and sickle solubility test.
His past medical history was significant for an unclear sickling disorder.
Since oxygenated sickle hemoglobin does not polymerize, GBT440 blocks polymerization and the resultant sickling of red blood cells (RBCs).
In sickle-cell disease, low-oxygen tension promotes RBC sickling and repeated episodes of sickling damages the cell membrane and makes it rigid.
The anti-sickling HSC will be transplanted back into the patient's bone marrow and multiplies the corrected cells that make red blood cells without sickling.
These conditions in SCD patients predispose to red blood cell sickling, increased blood viscosity leading to ischemia, and eventual infarction of renal microcirculation.
(2) The genetic defect, a single point mutation resulting in the substitution of valine for glutamic acid at the 6 position on the beta globulin of chromosome 11, causes a sickling of hemoglobin in red blood cells.
"Very few individuals homozygous for the sickling gene survive to reproductive age" (Volpe, 1971: p.