sickroom


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

sick·room

 (sĭk′ro͞om′, -ro͝om′)
n.
A room occupied by a sick person.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sickroom

(ˈsɪkˌruːm; -ˌrʊm)
n
1. (Medicine) a room to which a person who is ill is confined
2. (Medicine) a room set aside, as in a school, for people who are taken ill
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sick•room

(ˈsɪkˌrum, -ˌrʊm)

n.
a room in which a sick person is confined.
[1740–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sickroom - a room to which a sick person is confinedsickroom - a room to which a sick person is confined
room - an area within a building enclosed by walls and floor and ceiling; "the rooms were very small but they had a nice view"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

sickroom

[ˈsɪkrʊm] Ncuarto m del enfermo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sickroom

[ˈsɪkruːm] ninfirmerie f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sickroom

[ˈsɪkˌrʊm] nstanza di malato
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
She also speaks of a locked door of communication with the sickroom, the key of which had been removed, nobody knew by whom.
Meg had a quiet rapture, and then brooded over the letter, while Jo set the sickroom in order, and Hannah `knocked up a couple of pies in case of company unexpected".
A very few lines from Edmund shewed her the patient and the sickroom in a juster and stronger light than all Lady Bertram's sheets of paper could do.
The second princess had just come from the sickroom with her eyes red from weeping and sat down beside Dr.
He almost always saw her before going to the sickroom, and she appealed to him as to what she could do for mamma.
the consultations and paperwork intrude into the sickroom and turn what
However, this testimony came from people in the sickroom related to the defendant.
(A TV in the corner of her sickroom had played an Oprah episode in which a daughter spoke, to very moving effect, of how she'd been nourished throughout her childhood and adolescence by videos from her deceased mother.
This type of presupposition is triggered by presuppositional discourse stretches such as "Heedless of the proud world's enjoyment," "But God, how deadly dull to sample sickroom attendance night and day and never stir a foot away!," "And the sly baseness, fit to throttle, of entertaining the half-dead," and "When will the devil come to you" (Pushkin, 1977ed:7, 13).
In these stories, "often the schoolboy hero visits the sickroom of his closest friend, and eventually meets his family...