sideliner

side·lin·er

 (sīd′lī′nər)
n.
One that remains on the sidelines; a nonparticipant.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Donor-advised funds continued to be the talk of the philanthropy world in 2017 -- as an agent of change and, according to critics, a sideliner of money that should go directly to doing good.
The patent-pending tent was so successful that two of the students and Allen spun off a company to market and sell what now is called the SidelinER. In 2016, more than 50 college football teams--and one NFL franchise--used it.
And he's no sideliner or groupie, either -- his band, the Senders, took the stage alongside other punk rockers at CBGB.
6 Bear and Son Cutlery introduced the G13 and the G13 1/2 Sideliner lock this year.
A thumb-hole on the blade makes it easy to open with one hand and is secured open by a sideliner lock.
In the way he conducts his personal policies he appears as a ruthless sideliner of even his closest brothers in arms.
So if an insignificant sideliner from Africa can see through the fog, then I am sure all of them must realise the same thing.
Or try the Stowaway Sideliner, a 2ft 6in or 3ft bed which folds out length-ways.
Ramon's dad, Frank, works as an electrician and calls himself a sideliner beekeeper who currently maintains 20 beehives.
In beekeeping circles she's known as a sideliner, someone for whom beekeeping is a moneymaking business but not the main source of income.
Take this quiz to find out if you're a sideliner, heavy hitter or team player when it comes to fielding gossip that's going around about your BFF.