sightless

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sight·less

 (sīt′lĭs)
adj.
1. Unable to see with the eyes; blind.
2. Invisible.

sight′less·ly adv.
sight′less·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sightless

(ˈsaɪtlɪs)
adj
1. (Pathology) blind
2. invisible
ˈsightlessly adv
ˈsightlessness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sight•less

(ˈsaɪt lɪs)

adj.
1. blind.
2. invisible.
[1200–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sightless - lacking sightsightless - lacking sight; "blind as an eyeless beggar"
blind, unsighted - unable to see; "a person is blind to the extent that he must devise alternative techniques to do efficiently those things he would do with sight if he had normal vision"--Kenneth Jernigan
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

sightless

adjective
Without the sense of sight:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

sightless

[ˈsaɪtlɪs] ADJciego, invidente
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sightless

adj personerblindet, blind; sightless since birthvon Geburt an blind; worms are completely sightlessWürmer haben kein Sehvermögen (form), → Würmer können überhaupt nicht sehen; with sightless eyesmit blicklosen (geh)or toten Augen
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sightless

[ˈsaɪtlɪs] adj (person) → non vedente
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
The three of them enter a rowboat and Malorie sightlessly guides the boat downriver.
Or the difference between acting out a battle training programme in virtual goggles while inside the spy academy versus wandering outside and sightlessly walloping every civilian who crosses his path.
This is a blatant example of lawmakers sightlessly subscribing to party policy when casting votes on legislative concerns.
Grasped the top of the mask firmly, and pulled until I could see his eyes, very human-looking brown eyes, staring sightlessly into my face" (94).
For a few minutes, a long time in this business of verbal sprints, I look at the story sightlessly, pencil stuck in my frozen fingers.
The dead Fallschirmjager's eyes glinted sightlessly in the moonlight.
Carl invites India into his darkroom to see the prints pinned up, drying: the old woman sitting with her dog staring sightlessly at the cliffs and water; inside, with the fire and the window lighting her sweet, crafty face; tending her garden and feeding her goat.
He's covered with blood and his open eyes stare sightlessly upward.
Max paradoxically envisions Anna when behind the camera, as a "blind person, something in her eyes went dead, an essential light was extinguished;" she seems to be "peering inward, into herself' to find a "defining perspective, some essential point of view" from which she could "sightlessly" capture her subject's features (Banville 2005, 173).
Or it is the image of a humanity that has lost its way, yet plows ahead sightlessly, gropingly through life's seas: an act of faith?
The haunters and the haunted among graves/Mirror each other sightlessly.../...
In fact, he mocks at the malpractices of phony godmen, takes pot-shots against superstitions and the unfounded rituals that we sightlessly pursue and hits out at the money-making industry that religion has developed into in the present day.