sightlessness


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sight·less

 (sīt′lĭs)
adj.
1. Unable to see with the eyes; blind.
2. Invisible.

sight′less·ly adv.
sight′less·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sightlessness - the state of being blind or lacking sightsightlessness - the state of being blind or lacking sight
legal blindness - vision that is 20/200 or worse in both eyes (20/200 vision is the ability to see at 20 feet what a normal eye can see at 200 feet)
vision defect, visual defect, visual disorder, visual impairment - impairment of the sense of sight
anopia - sightlessness (especially because of a structural defect in or the absence of an eye)
snowblindness, snow-blindness - temporary blindness caused by exposure to sunlight reflected from snow or ice
eyelessness - blindness due to loss of the eyes
figural blindness - inability to see shapes and contours
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

sightlessness

noun
The condition of not being able to see:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

sightlessness

nBlindheit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
(5) Moorhouse's interest In the point of view of the outsider, or the periphery--Ironically, here, In terms of what can be perceived and understood from a position of sightlessness in such a vision-centric world, especially that of the cinema--is what gives Proof both its eccentricity and its acuity.
Unlike the other characters who are simply unable to see given the lack of light, this everyday sightlessness is, in the case of Don Quixote, surpassed by a second literary sight that brings forth illuminated fictions that both enchant and obscure.
covered by night, murky, gloomy, once again suggesting sightlessness and
Diabetes mellitus especially is one of the principal causes of demise and disability in the world and is highly responsible for kidney failure, heart disease, and sightlessness. About 200 million people in the world are afflicted with diabetes mellitus [2].
At least that's how sightlessness is represented by a culture awash in images, imaging and other audiovisual effluvia.In a world designed for the sighted, blindness means exclusion.
It is, as the doctor's wife realizes, "a luz que nao os deixa ver" (260), and the results of that enlightened sightlessness are disastrous.
The motif of sightlessness recurs several times in the poem, inviting us "to step blindfolded" into the spaces of her memory.
The works from this year-long period of impending sightlessness resonate with undiluted fear.
The white sightlessness, which in the novel is described by the blind as a "white sea," is reinterpreted on the screen in terms of a viscous, translucent ensemble of vague forms floating in a vast colorless and gleaming space.
If initially left the eye-sight disease untreated, most of types glaucoma will progress towards worsening visual damage which finally become cause of the sightlessness.
But this tale of sightlessness and discernment also exposes the injustice of the structures that mediate contact between the great and the meek--structures designed to keep poverty hidden in plain sight.
In both paintings we become voyeurs to blindness, spectators of the sightlessness of others, whose own experience is dominated by darkness and tactility.