sightlessness


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sight·less

 (sīt′lĭs)
adj.
1. Unable to see with the eyes; blind.
2. Invisible.

sight′less·ly adv.
sight′less·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sightlessness - the state of being blind or lacking sightsightlessness - the state of being blind or lacking sight
legal blindness - vision that is 20/200 or worse in both eyes (20/200 vision is the ability to see at 20 feet what a normal eye can see at 200 feet)
vision defect, visual defect, visual disorder, visual impairment - impairment of the sense of sight
anopia - sightlessness (especially because of a structural defect in or the absence of an eye)
snowblindness, snow-blindness - temporary blindness caused by exposure to sunlight reflected from snow or ice
eyelessness - blindness due to loss of the eyes
figural blindness - inability to see shapes and contours

sightlessness

noun
The condition of not being able to see:
Translations

sightlessness

nBlindheit f
References in periodicals archive ?
At least that's how sightlessness is represented by a culture awash in images, imaging and other audiovisual effluvia.
It is, as the doctor's wife realizes, "a luz que nao os deixa ver" (260), and the results of that enlightened sightlessness are disastrous.
The motif of sightlessness recurs several times in the poem, inviting us "to step blindfolded" into the spaces of her memory.
The works from this year-long period of impending sightlessness resonate with undiluted fear.
The white sightlessness, which in the novel is described by the blind as a "white sea," is reinterpreted on the screen in terms of a viscous, translucent ensemble of vague forms floating in a vast colorless and gleaming space.
If initially left the eye-sight disease untreated, most of types glaucoma will progress towards worsening visual damage which finally become cause of the sightlessness.
But this tale of sightlessness and discernment also exposes the injustice of the structures that mediate contact between the great and the meek--structures designed to keep poverty hidden in plain sight.
In both paintings we become voyeurs to blindness, spectators of the sightlessness of others, whose own experience is dominated by darkness and tactility.
Thoreau establishes a theme of sight, sightlessness, and vision while at the same time laying out a topography for the road's landscape.
A brief look at the literary sources containing either allusions or extensive references to the visual aspect of the initiatory experience supports this assertion about the centrality of seeing and its lack (whether we call it sightlessness or blindness) in the context of some of the best-known mystery cults of the Greek-speaking world.
Risto could feel Punka's eyes resting on him, but then the eyes fell away, lapsing again into sightlessness, and Risto stood straighter in his tight but gorgeous shoes and said, directly to Punka, "Would you tell me, te molam, who owns the horse?
Generally, Sightlessness may be explained as a response to three types of selective pressure (Hackman 1964; Fennah 1967; Kerzhner 1981; Bickel 2006): adaptation to cold or windy climate, life in forest litter or in low dense/sparse vegetation, and parasitism.