signalling


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sig·nal

 (sĭg′nəl)
n.
1.
a. An indicator, such as a gesture or colored light, that serves as a means of communication. See Synonyms at gesture.
b. A message communicated by such means.
2. Something that incites action: The peace treaty was the signal for celebration.
3. Biology A physical entity, such as a chemical or an electromagnetic wave, that activates a cell receptor and elicits a specific response.
4.
a. Electronics An impulse or fluctuating quantity, as of electrical voltage or light intensity, whose variations represent coded information.
b. Computers A sequence of digital values whose variations represent coded information.
5. The sound, image, or message transmitted or received by means of telecommunications.
adj.
Notably out of the ordinary: a signal feat; a signal event.
v. sig·naled, sig·nal·ing, sig·nals or sig·nalled or sig·nal·ling
v.tr.
1. To make a signal to: I signaled the driver to proceed.
2. To relate or make known by signals: They have signaled their willingness to negotiate.
3. To cause an effect in (a cell) by the activation of a receptor, as by a neurotransmitter or hormone.
v.intr.
To make a signal or signals.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Medieval Latin signāle, from neuter of Late Latin signālis, of a sign, from Latin signum, sign; see sign.]

sig′nal·er, sig′nal·ler n.

signalling

or

signaling

n
the action of generating or transmitting signals
Translations

signalling

, (US) signaling
References in periodicals archive ?
Signalling in the pitches is more complicated than it sounds.
After signalling the pitch to the mound (as described), the catcher is ready to set up under the hitter and perform his single, most important function: receive the ball with impeccable technique.