signalman


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signalman

(ˈsɪɡnəlmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Railways) a railway employee in charge of the signals and points within a section
2. (Nautical Terms) a man who sends and receives signals, esp in the navy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sig•nal•man

(ˈsɪg nl mən)

n., pl. -men.
a person whose occupation or duty is signaling, as on a railroad or in the army.
[1730–40]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.signalman - a railroad employee in charge of signals and point in a railroad yard
signaler, signaller - someone who communicates by signals
railroad man, railroader, railway man, railwayman, trainman - an employee of a railroad
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
عامِل الإشاراتمُشَوِّر، مُرْسِل الإشارات
hradlařsignalista
signalmand
jeladószemaforkezelõ
merkjamaîur
signalista
işaret memuruişaretçi

signalman

[ˈsɪgnlmən] N (signalmen (pl)) (Rail) → guardavía mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

signalman

[ˈsɪgnəlmən] n (RAILWAYS)aiguilleur m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

signalman

[ˈsɪgnlmən] n (-men (pl)) (Rail) → deviatore m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

signal

(ˈsignəl) noun
1. a sign (eg a movement of the hand, a light, a sound), especially one arranged beforehand, giving a command, warning or other message. He gave the signal to advance.
2. a machine etc used for this purpose. a railway signal.
3. the wave, sound received or sent out by a radio set etc.
verbpast tense, past participle ˈsignalled , (American) ˈsignaled
1. to make signals (to). The policeman signalled the driver to stop.
2. to send (a message etc) by means of signals.
ˈsignalman noun
1. a person who operates railway signals.
2. a person who sends signals in general. He is a signalman in the army.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the night of September 14, 1870, the signalman at Tamworth was expecting the arrival of a goods train, and had set his points and signals to bring the train into a siding behind the platform.
Last night, Lindsey Kerr, for Railtrack, said the signalman in Uttoxeter had received no call for permission to cross the track prior to the accident.
It was then the signalman at Tremains East box Mr Bill Roberts phoned me to have a look at the locomotive, having taken its water.
It was quick action by the signalman that prevented what would have been an awful mess."
John McClure, president of Signalman Publishing, stated, "This is an excellent book for anyone who wants to understand the Gospel message and appreciate the interaction between Jesus and the penitent thief.
SAD TIME: Kerry and Harley at the funeral, far left, Major Sally Richardson, left, and how we told of the incident in which David was hurt, above MILITARY HONOURS: David's wife Kerry carries their son Harley behind his coffin, above, which was carried by his Army comrades, and decorated with flowers from Harley saying 'Daddy,' right MUCH LOVED: Signalman David Grout, above, died last month with head injuries
In the story, a signalman is visited by a ghost, whose appearances precede a tragedy on the railway line.
Another Huddersfield survivor was Signalman Tony Baines, then aged 17, of Slaithwaite.
Large 'Stop' signs, which include instructions on how to telephone the signalman, were visible at the Evesham crossing.
A spokesman for British Transport Police said: "The woman said she pulled up at the crossing and asked the signalman if it was safe to cross and he said no.
The hearing, which was delayed when Clear suffered a panic attack, heard the signalman had lost his job and was seeking medical help.
Davies passed a sign warning lorries more than 18.75metres (61ft 6ins) long, as his was, to stop and phone the signalman for permission to cross.