signor


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si·gnor

also si·gnior  (sēn-yôr′)
n. pl. si·gno·ri (sēn-yôr′ē, -yō′rē) also si·gnors or si·gniors Abbr. Sig. or S.
Used as a courtesy title for a man in an Italian-speaking area, equivalent to Mr.

[Italian, variant of signore; see signore.]

signor

(ˈsiːnjɔː; Italian siɲˈɲor) or

signior

n, pl -gnors or -gnori (Italian -ˈɲori)
(Peoples) an Italian man: usually used before a name as a title equivalent to Mr

si•gnor

(ˈsin yɔr, -yoʊr, sɪnˈyɔr, -ˈyoʊr; It. siˈnyɔr)

n., pl. -gnors, It. -gno•ri (-ˈnyɔ ri)
an Italian term of address for a man, equivalent to sir or Mr. Abbr.: Sig., sig.
[1570–80; < Italian; see signore]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.signor - used as an Italian courtesy titlesignor - used as an Italian courtesy title; can be prefixed to the name or used separately
adult male, man - an adult person who is male (as opposed to a woman); "there were two women and six men on the bus"
Translations
References in classic literature ?
At a third, Signor Ferranti, who was in Providence, sang a selection from "The Marriage of Figaro" to an audience in Boston.
This "scabby one" rowed at the oar as a slave of the Grand Signor's for fourteen years, and when over thirty-four years of age, in resentment at having been struck by a Turk while at the oar, turned renegade and renounced his faith in order to be able to revenge himself; and such was his valour that, without owing his advancement to the base ways and means by which most favourites of the Grand Signor rise to power, he came to be king of Algiers, and afterwards general-on-sea, which is the third place of trust in the realm.
As it is no inconsiderable affair to spend the Carnival at Rome, especially when you have no great desire to sleep on the Piazza del Popolo, or the Campo Vaccino, they wrote to Signor Pastrini, the proprietor of the Hotel de Londres, Piazza di Spagna, to reserve comfortable apartments for them.
Having restored his authority, not to leave it at risk by trusting either to the French or other outside forces, he had recourse to his wiles, and he knew so well how to conceal his mind that, by the mediation of Signor Pagolo--whom the duke did not fail to secure with all kinds of attention, giving him money, apparel, and horses--the Orsini were reconciled, so that their simplicity brought them into his power at Sinigalia.
I say this for your sake, Master Cropole, as well as for yours, Signor Pittrino.
No; that garden is cultivated by the own hands of Signor Giacomo Rappaccini, the famous doctor, who, I warrant him, has been heard of as far as Naples.
The Italian was surprised at my blocking the way and remarked pleasantly, "It's cold outside, Signor.
If Signor Muscari were English be would still be looking for highwaymen in Wandsworth.
She thought it was her signor marito who had sent them, and she cried a little and said it was a folly.
Hobnail, the reformer; and Reverend Jul Bat, who has converted the whole torrid zone in his Sunday school; and Signor Torre del Greco, who extinguished Vesuvius by pouring into it the Bay of Naples; Spahi, the Persian ambassador; and Tul Wil Shan, the exiled nabob of Nepaul, whose saddle is the new moon.
Signor Rodriguez, whom they knew to be the manager of the hotel, stood quite near them in the doorway surveying the scene--the gentlemen lounging in chairs, the couples leaning over coffee-cups, the game of cards in the centre under profuse clusters of electric light.
Lady Patrick of course you know, and Signor Scobel, and Adelaide Cunningham--you do know her, don't you, Mr.