infarction

(redirected from silent myocardial infarction)
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Related to silent myocardial infarction: silent myocardial ischemia, transmural infarction

infarction

a localized area of tissue that is dying or dead, having been deprived of its blood supply because of an obstruction
Not to be confused with:
infraction – breach; violation; infringement: infraction of the rules; in medicine, an incomplete fracture of a bone

in·farc·tion

 (ĭn-färk′shən)
n.
1. The formation or development of an infarct.
2. An infarct.

infarction

(ɪnˈfɑːkʃən)
n
1. (Pathology) the formation or development of an infarct
2. (Pathology) another word for infarct

in•farc•tion

(ɪnˈfɑrk ʃən)

n.
1. the formation of an infarct.
2. an infarct.
[1680–90]

infarction

a condition in which a localized area of muscular tissue is dying or dead owing to insufficient supply of blood, as occurs in a heart attack.
See also: Heart
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.infarction - localized necrosis resulting from obstruction of the blood supply
MI, myocardial infarct, myocardial infarction - destruction of heart tissue resulting from obstruction of the blood supply to the heart muscle
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
Translations

infarction

n (Med)
(= dead tissue)Infarkt m
(= forming of dead tissue)Infarktbildung f

infarction

n infarto, acción f y efecto de un infarto; acute myocardial — infarto agudo de miocardio
References in periodicals archive ?
It has been noted that autonomic neuropathy in diabetes mellitus leads to disturbed cardiac perception and thus may play a role in silent myocardial infarction.7
In the second analysis, there were no significant differences between treatment groups in terms of the primary cardiovascular end points: incidence of nonfatal and silent myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death.
-- More than 17% of postmenopausal women have a moderate or high likelihood of having silent myocardial infarction, based on findings from more than 60,000 women who participated in the Women's Health Initiative.