silly season


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silly season

n
(Journalism & Publishing) Brit a period, usually during the hot summer months, when journalists fill space reporting on frivolous events and activities

sil′ly sea`son


n.
a time of year, usu. in midsummer, characterized by the publication of exaggerated or frivolous news stories.
[1860–65]

silly season

- Any slow news period characterized by trivial news or no news.
See also related terms for news.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silly season - a time usually late summer characterized by exaggerated news stories about frivolous matters for want of real news
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Translations

silly season

nnärrische Zeit; (Brit Press) → Saure-Gurken-Zeit f
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
It was in the silly season, and a prominent editor, a cousin of the temporary laboratory-assistant, appealed to the conscience of the nation.
Journalists across the globe have regarded this time of the year, the heart of the summer, as the silly season in which nothing of much interest happens, at least on the political front.
AUGUST is traditionally the silly season. Brexit makes this year slightly different, of course, but it is good to see a fine British tradition still being preserved.
I know it's the silly season, but this is ridiculous.
We are now officially in the Silly Season as measured by most media outlets and Uncle Norbert and I see no reason why this should not be reflected in the letters' page.
AS well as being the season of goodwill, Christmas does tend to have a habit of being silly season when it comes to things you can buy.
It must be the silly season because they seem more prevalent than ever, so beware.
AND EastEnders surpassing its own laughable standards with its annual silly season, runaway pet story.
THE case: In the corporate world, the summer months are traditionally known as the "silly season", when everyone goes on holiday and you can never get anything done.
Dyster's meaningless and pandering gesture was a fitting kickoff to what his predecessor, former mayor Jake Palillo, dubbed the silly season, a time when politicians do strange things, anonymous mailers accuse candidates of having mafia ties, being racist or worse, nominating petitions are fraudulently signed or honestly signed ones are challenged at the Board of Elections and pretty much nothing gets done in city government.
Elsewhere of course, it's permanently silly season and Geoff and Noreen aren't the only new arrivals checking in.
Police have been beset with "inappropriate" enquiries over the silly season, including a 999 call for marriage counselling and a man who was "a bit scared" of a hedgehog.