silo

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si·lo

 (sī′lō)
n. pl. si·los
1.
a. A usually tall cylindrical structure, typically next to a barn, in which silage is produced and stored.
b. Any of several other structures or containers used for the same purpose, such as a covered trench or a polyethylene bag.
2. An underground shelter for a missile, usually equipped to launch the missile or to raise it into a launching position.
tr.v. si·loed, si·lo·ing, si·los
To store in a silo.

[Spanish.]

silo

(ˈsaɪləʊ)
n, pl -los
1. (Agriculture) a pit, trench, horizontal container, or tower, often cylindrical in shape, in which silage is made and stored
2. (Military) a strengthened underground position in which missile systems are sited for protection against attack
[C19: from Spanish, perhaps from Celtic]

si•lo

(ˈsaɪ loʊ)

n., pl. -los, n.
1. a structure, typically cylindrical, in which fodder or forage is kept.
2. a pit or underground space for storing grain, greens, etc.
3. an underground installation constructed of concrete and steel, designed to house a ballistic missile.
v.t.
4. to put into or preserve in a silo.
[1825–35; < Sp]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silo - a cylindrical tower used for storing silagesilo - a cylindrical tower used for storing silage
tower - a structure taller than its diameter; can stand alone or be attached to a larger building
2.silo - military installation consisting of an underground structure where ballistic missiles can be stored and fired
military installation - any facility servicing military forces
armed forces, armed services, military, military machine, war machine - the military forces of a nation; "their military is the largest in the region"; "the military machine is the same one we faced in 1991 but now it is weaker"
Translations
silo

silo

[ˈsaɪləʊ] N (silos (pl)) (gen) → silo m

silo

[ˈsaɪləʊ] nsilo m

silo

nSilo nt; (for missile) → (Raketen)silo nt

silo

[ˈsaɪləʊ] nsilo
References in periodicals archive ?
Breathing silo gas causes nitric acid to form in the lungs, says ASAE member, John Shutske, farm safety and health specialist with the University of Minnesota Extension Service.
Dangerous levels of silo gas are generated during the first several days after the silo is filled.
Another safety hazard on farms is silo gas, which is formed by natural fermentation of chopped silage.