silver age


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silver age

n.
A period of history secondary in achievement to that of a golden age.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

silver age

n
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) (in Greek and Roman mythology) the second of the world's major epochs, inferior to the preceding golden age and characterized by opulence and irreligion
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the postclassical period of Latin literature, occupying the early part of the Roman imperial era, characterized by an overindulgence in elegance for its own sake and empty scholarly rhetoric
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sil′ver age′


n.
1. a period of diminished achievement following a golden age.
2. (sometimes cap.) (in Greek and Roman myth) a period following the golden age, characterized by an increase in impiety and human weakness.
[1555–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silver age - (classical mythology) the second age of the world, characterized by opulence and irreligion; by extension, a period secondary in achievement to a golden age
classical mythology - the system of mythology of the Greeks and Romans together; much of Roman mythology (especially the gods) was borrowed from the Greeks
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in classic literature ?
140-155) But when earth had covered this generation also -- they are called blessed spirits of the underworld by men, and, though they are of second order, yet honour attends them also -- Zeus the Father made a third generation of mortal men, a brazen race, sprung from ash-trees (4); and it was in no way equal to the silver age, but was terrible and strong.
This temporal division is reasonable and enjoys fairly wide acceptance, even if some classicists are accustomed to distinguish classical Latin prose in the strictest sense, which denotes the period of Cicero and Caesar, from the first two centuries A.D., which is often labelled "post-Augustan," "post-classical" or "the Silver Age."
Silver Age In Latin literature, the period from approximately AD 18 to AD 133 that is a time of marked literary achievement second only to the previous Golden Age (70 BC-AD 18).
His successive chapter titles--"The Dawn," "The Silver Age," "The Golden Age," etc., indicate that we have entered a flowering period of great activity predetermined by what went before.
Poets of the silver age, such as Virgil, either recast and polished the poetic materials of the golden age or wrote original works of comedy and satire.
Johnson, America's Silver Age (1938); and Richard N.
The Royal King and the Loyal Subject (c1602), The English Traveller (c1624), and a series of dramatizations of classical myths: The Golden Age (c1610), The Silver Age (c1610), The Brazen Age (c1610), and The Iron Age: Parts I and II (c1610).
Originally created in 1943 for National Publications (later DC Comics) in 1941 by Mort Weisinger and Paul Norris, it was the silver age version of the character, re-launched in 1956, which became famous.
Stan with Marvel artist John Romita in 1976 Working with other comic greats like legendary artists Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko, Lee would go on to create what is considered the 'Silver Age' of comics.
Working with other comic greats Stan with Marvel artist John Romita in 1976 like legendary artists Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko, Lee would go on to create what is considered the 'Silver Age' of comics.
Lee was a pioneer in the silver age of comics, as the creator or co-creator of characters that had relatable, human flaws and as a groundbreaking promoter of the Marvel universe.