silver bromide


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silver bromide

n.
A pale yellow crystalline compound, AgBr, that turns black on exposure to light and is used as the light-sensitive component on ordinary photographic film and plates.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

silver bromide

n
(Elements & Compounds) a yellowish insoluble powder that darkens when exposed to light: used in making photographic emulsions. Formula: AgBr
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sil′ver bro′mide



n.
a yellowish powder, AgBr, that darkens on exposure to light: used chiefly in photographic emulsions.
[1875–80]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.silver bromide - a bromide that darkens when exposed to light; used in making photographic emulsions
photographic emulsion, emulsion - a light-sensitive coating on paper or film; consists of fine grains of silver bromide suspended in a gelatin
bromide - any of the salts of hydrobromic acid; formerly used as a sedative but now generally replaced by safer drugs
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first commercial silver gelatin paper appeared in 1874 and Joseph Swan obtained an English patent for silver bromide paper in 1879, but the golden age of silver gelatin printing was from 1900-1990 with silver gelatin photographs made by Bernice Abbott, Ansel Adams, Richard Avedon, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Dorothea Lange, Sebastiao Salgado, Man Ray, and Edward Weston among many others.
Most incongruous was a large specimen of silver bromide, the chemical base for nearly all twentieth-century photography.
Slifkin of the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N.C., uses a large crystal of silver chloride, which is chemically similar to the silver bromide of usual photographic emulsions.