simile


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Related to simile: metaphor, figures of speech

sim·i·le

 (sĭm′ə-lē)
n.
A figure of speech in which two essentially unlike things are compared, often in a phrase introduced by like or as, as in "How like the winter hath my absence been" or "So are you to my thoughts as food to life" (Shakespeare).

[Middle English, from Latin, likeness, comparison, from neuter of similis, like; see similar.]

simile

(ˈsɪmɪlɪ)
n
(Linguistics) a figure of speech that expresses the resemblance of one thing to another of a different category, usually introduced by as or like. Compare metaphor
[C14: from Latin simile something similar, from similis like]

sim•i•le

(ˈsɪm ə li)

n.
a figure of speech in which two distinct things are compared by using “like” or “as,” as in “She is like a rose.” Compare metaphor.
[1350–1400; < Latin: image, likeness, comparison, n. use of neuter of similis similar]

simile

1. A comparison of one person or thing with another by saying that the first is like the second, as in “She sang like an angel.”
2. Likening one thing to another.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.simile - a figure of speech that expresses a resemblance between things of different kinds (usually formed with `like' or `as')
figure of speech, trope, image, figure - language used in a figurative or nonliteral sense
Translations
تَشْبيه
přirovnání
lignelsesammenligning
hasonlat
líkingsamlíking
salīdzinājums
prirovnanie
liknelse
benzetmeteşbih

simile

[ˈsɪmɪlɪ] Nsímil m

simile

[ˈsɪmɪli] ncomparaison f

simile

nGleichnis nt; his use of similesein Gebrauch mvon Gleichnissen

simile

[ˈsɪmɪlɪ] nsimilitudine f, paragone m

simile

(ˈsiməli) noun
a form of expression using `like' or `as', in which one thing is compared to another which it only resembles in one or a small number of ways. `Her hair was like silk' is a simile.
References in classic literature ?
Weathercock can without the wind," suggested Jo, as he paused for a simile.
The effect is as if the voice had been dyed black; or,--if we must use a more moderate simile,--this miserable croak, running through all the variations of the voice, is like a black silken thread, on which the crystal beads of speech are strung, and whence they take their hue.
What I saw in him -- as evidently as the indestructible ramparts of Old Ticonderoga, already cited as the most appropriate simile -- was the features of stubborn and ponderous endurance, which might well have amounted to obstinacy in his earlier days; of integrity, that, like most of his other endowments, lay in a somewhat heavy mass, and was just as unmalleable or unmanageable as a ton of iron ore; and of benevolence which, fiercely as he led the bayonets on at Chippewa or Fort Erie, I take to be of quite as genuine a stamp as what actuates any or all the polemical philanthropists of the age.
The mountains were bigger and grander than ever, as they stood there thinking their solemn thoughts with their heads in the drifting clouds, but the villages at their feet--when the painstaking eye could trace them up and find them--were so reduced, almost invisible, and lay so flat against the ground, that the exactest simile I can devise is to compare them to ant-deposits of granulated dirt overshadowed by the huge bulk of a cathedral.
He connects his illness with great disturbance and agitation, naturally, and that's the figure, or the simile, or whatever it's called, which he chooses to use.
the tree at whose foot I lay had opened its rocky side, and in the cleft, like a long lily-bud sliding from its green sheath, stood a dryad, and my speech failed and my breath went as I looked upon her beauty, for which mortality has no simile.
he said, "your simile of the tiger good, for me, and I shall adopt him.
Well, out of the five or six millions which form your real capital, you have just lost nearly two millions, which must, of course, in the same degree diminish your credit and fictitious fortune; to follow out my simile, your skin has been opened by bleeding, and this if repeated three or four times will cause death -- so pay attention to it, my dear Monsieur Danglars.
The simile suggests the hand of the wife or daughter of a magistrate who had often seen her father come in cross and tired.
Not only a fellow-countryman, my good sir," said Challenger, "but also, if I may be allowed to enlarge your simile, an ally of the first value.
He had never before seen a woman's lips and teeth which forced upon his mind with such persistent iteration the old Elizabethan simile of roses filled with snow.
Thorpe never finished the simile, for it could hardly have been a proper one.