similitude

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si·mil·i·tude

 (sĭ-mĭl′ĭ-to͞od′, -tyo͞od′)
n.
1. Similarity; resemblance: "Not every case of similitude in nature is proof of a close bloodline" (Natalie Angier).
2. Archaic One that closely resembles another.
3. Archaic A simile, allegory, or parable.

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin similitūdō, from similis, like; see similar.]

similitude

(sɪˈmɪlɪˌtjuːd)
n
1. likeness; similarity
2. a thing or sometimes a person that is like or the counterpart of another
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) archaic a simile, allegory, or parable
[C14: from Latin similitūdō, from similis like]

si•mil•i•tude

(sɪˈmɪl ɪˌtud, -ˌtyud)

n.
1. likeness; resemblance.
2. a person or thing that is like or the counterpart of another.
3. semblance; image.
4. a likening or comparison; a simile, parable, or allegory.
[1325–75; Middle English < Latin similitūdō likeness, derivative of similis similar]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.similitude - similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or thingssimilitude - similarity in appearance or character or nature between persons or things; "man created God in his own likeness"
similarity - the quality of being similar
comparability, compare, comparison, equivalence - qualities that are comparable; "no comparison between the two books"; "beyond compare"
mirror image, reflection, reflexion - a likeness in which left and right are reversed
naturalness - the likeness of a representation to the thing represented; "engineers strove to increase the naturalness of recorded music"
resemblance - similarity in appearance or external or superficial details
spitting image - a perfect likeness or counterpart
dissimilitude, unlikeness - dissimilarity evidenced by an absence of likeness
2.similitude - a duplicate copysimilitude - a duplicate copy      
duplication, duplicate - a copy that corresponds to an original exactly; "he made a duplicate for the files"

similitude

noun
Translations

similitude

[sɪˈmɪlɪtjuːd] Nsimilitud f, semejanza f

similitude

n (liter)Ähnlichkeit f
References in classic literature ?
I assured him, "how extremely desirous I was that he should be satisfied on every point; but I doubted much, whether it would be possible for me to explain myself on several subjects, whereof his honour could have no conception; because I saw nothing in his country to which I could resemble them; that, however, I would do my best, and strive to express myself by similitudes, humbly desiring his assistance when I wanted proper words;" which he was pleased to promise me.
"I am aware that you are very much younger, but the similitudes of opinions, origins and perhaps at bottom, faintly, of character, of chivalrous devotion - no, you must be able to understand him in a measure.
With both her hands on his arm, she shored it back and tried to draw it forward sharply in similitude of a punch.
However, I went down thus two or three days, and having seen nothing, I began to be a little bolder, and to think there was really nothing in it but my own imagination; but I could not persuade myself fully of this till I should go down to the shore again, and see this print of a foot, and measure it by my own, and see if there was any similitude or fitness, that I might be assured it was my own foot: but when I came to the place, first, it appeared evidently to me, that when I laid up my boat I could not possibly be on shore anywhere thereabouts; secondly, when I came to measure the mark with my own foot, I found my foot not so large by a great deal.
A striking similitude between the brother and sister now first arrested my attention; and Usher, divining, perhaps, my thoughts, murmured out some few words from which I learned that the deceased and himself had been twins, and that sympathies of a scarcely intelligible nature had always existed between them.
Superstition, without a veil, is a deformed thing; for, as it addeth deformity to an ape, to be so like a man, so the similitude of superstition to religion, makes it the more deformed.
The points of similitude consist in the rivalship of power, applicable to both, and in the CONCENTRATION of large portions of the strength of the community into particular DEPOSITORIES, in one case at the disposal of individuals, in the other case at the disposal of political bodies.
In all these, however, and in every other similitude of life to the theatre, the resemblance hath been always taken from the stage only.
Though all comparison in the way of general bulk between the whale and the elephant is preposterous, inasmuch as in that particular the elephant stands in much the same respect to the whale that a dog does to the elephant; nevertheless, there are not wanting some points of curious similitude; among these is the spout.
The mother herself -- as if the red ignominy were so deeply scorched into her brain that all her conceptions assumed its form -- had carefully wrought out the similitude, lavishing many hours of morbid ingenuity to create an analogy between the object of her affection and the emblem of her guilt and torture.
"That is true," said Don Quixote, "for it would not be right that the accessories of the drama should be real, instead of being mere fictions and semblances, like the drama itself; towards which, Sancho- and, as a necessary consequence, towards those who represent and produce it- I would that thou wert favourably disposed, for they are all instruments of great good to the State, placing before us at every step a mirror in which we may see vividly displayed what goes on in human life; nor is there any similitude that shows us more faithfully what we are and ought to be than the play and the players.
No regular beauty pleases egotistical human beings so much as a softened and refined likeness of themselves; for this reason, fathers regard with complacency the lineaments of their daughters' faces, where frequently their own similitude is found flatteringly associated with softness of hue and delicacy of outline.