simmer dim


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simmer dim

(ˈsɪmər; -mə)
n
(Physical Geography) Scot the night-long twilight found in the Northern Isles around midsummer
[Scottish form of summer1 + dim]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
matthews also won the Longside 10-mile race in may and last month's Shetland Simmer Dim Half marathon.
The islands are wild and rugged yet at the same time both temperate and welcoming, with 19 hours of daylight in midsummer (called "simmer dim" by the locals).
In Shetland on summer solstice, there are more than 19 hours of daylight - the long twilight is known as the "simmer dim".
The sense of place delivered in the book is not just authentic but altogether transporting -- GrydehA[cedilla]j's descriptions of "simmer dim" (the summer twilight, when the sun lights the sky for up to nineteen hours) and the Up Helly Aa festival, along with the native characters' unique dialect, give readers a real, complete world, one that is probably unknown to most.
Locals experience the 'simmer dim' - a near twilight that envelopes the landscape in an eerie glow from around midnight until sunrise some hours later.
This is especially true during the summer months when the sun shines for almost 19 hours and the night is little more than dusk and known as the "simmer dim".
William Greenway's sixth collection Simmer Dim was published
You can also talk knowledgeably about it as the Land of the Simmer Dim, as there is virtually no darkness around mid-summer.
In Scotland, the summer twilight is far more noticeable than further south in the UK and complete darkness is lost to the long twilight known as the "simmer dim".