simnel cake

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simnel cake

(ˈsɪmnəl)
n
(Cookery) Brit a fruit cake containing a layer of marzipan, often coloured with saffron and topped with marzipan, traditionally eaten at Lent or Easter
[C13 simenel, from Old French, from Latin simila fine flour, probably of Semitic origin; related to Greek semidalis fine flour]

sim′nel cake`

(ˈsɪm nl)
n.
Chiefly Brit.
a rich fruitcake covered with almond paste.
[1830–40; simnel, Middle English simenel < Old French, ultimately < Latin simila or Greek semídālis fine flour]
Translations

simnel cake

n (Brit) → marzipanüberzogener Früchtekuchen
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References in periodicals archive ?
Fromhot cross bunsand chocolate eggs, to simnel cakes and chewy sweets, if you've got a sweet tooth, prepare to be in your element.
It is traditionally eaten on the middle Sunday of Lent, when the fast is relaxed a little, but thank goodness sanity now prevails, and we can eat our Simnel cakes in full unabashed heresy, whenever we want.
Temptations is run by Chrissie Ashworth, who is currently busy making Simnel cakes for Easter.
In this two-part series she looks at the food we traditionally eat in the run-up to Easter Sunday - from simnel cakes and hot cross buns to roast lamb.
Well, apart from watching adverts pressing us to stud lamb legs with garlic and reciting the late 20th and early 21st-century mantra of "who exactly buys Simnel cakes, anyhow?
And forget that pretty myth of Georgian serving wenches carrying Simnel cakes back to their mothers on March 25, now known as Mothering Sunday.
Simnel cakes and marzipan figures such as eggs, chicks, flowers and cake toppings are a 'doddle' using the company's almond paste and marzipan products.
We've eaten the pancakes, the simnel cakes, the carlins and the hot cross buns.
But traditional simnel cakes come close with their toasted marzipan icing topping and centre, and balls of the almond paste to represent the Apostles.
The baking of small cakes, like simnel cakes , to mark the beginning of spring actually dates back to ancient cultures including the Egyptians and later the Greeks and Romans, who baked cakes for their moon goddesses.