simon-pure


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si·mon-pure

 (sī′mən-pyo͝or′)
adj.
1. Genuinely and thoroughly pure.
2. Superficially or hypocritically virtuous.

[From the phrase the real Simon Pure, after Simon Pure, a character in the play A Bold Stroke for a Wife by Susannah Centlivre (1669-1723).]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

simon-pure

adj
real; genuine; authentic
[C19: from the phrase the real Simon Pure, name of a character in the play A Bold Stroke for a Wife (1717) by Susannah Centlivre (1669–1723) who is impersonated by another character in some scenes]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

si′mon-pure′

(ˈsaɪ mən)

adj.
1. real; genuine.
2. untainted; pure.
[1795–1805; short for the real Simon Pure, alluding to the victim of impersonation in S. Centlivre's play A Bold Stroke for a Wife (1718)]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
"He's a labrick--just a Simon-pure labrick, if there was one."
And soon the bell--a genuine, simon-pure bell --rang, and we were invited to "the saloon." I had thought before that we had a tent or so too many, but now here was one, at least, provided for; it was to be used for nothing but an eating-saloon.
But the surprise rose higher still when the dame, with a body oozing easy indifference at every pore, but eyes that gave it all away by absolutely flaming with vanity, slowly unfolded an actual simon-pure tablecloth and spread it.