simony

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Related to simoniacs: barrators

si·mo·ny

 (sī′mə-nē, sĭm′ə-)
n.
The buying or selling of ecclesiastical offices or of indulgences or other spiritual things.

[Middle English simonie, from Old French, from Late Latin simōnia, after Simon Magus, a sorcerer who tried to buy spiritual powers from the Apostle Peter (Acts 8:9-24).]

si′mo·nist n.

simony

(ˈsaɪmənɪ)
n
(Ecclesiastical Terms) Christianity the practice, now usually regarded as a sin, of buying or selling spiritual or Church benefits such as pardons, relics, etc, or preferments
[C13: from Old French simonie, from Late Latin sīmōnia, from the name of Simon Magus]
ˈsimonist n

si•mo•ny

(ˈsaɪ mə ni, ˈsɪm ə-)

n.
1. the making of profit out of sacred things.
2. the buying or selling of ecclesiastical preferments, benefices, etc.
[1175–1225; Middle English < Late Latin simōnia; after Simon Magus, who tried to purchase apostolic powers; see Simon (definition 4), -y3]
si′mon•ist, n.

simonism, simony

the practice or defense of the selling of church relies, preferments, etc. — simoniac, simonist, n.
See also: Catholicism
the sin or offense of selling or granting for personal advantage church appointments, benefices, preferments, etc. — simoniac, simonist, n.
See also: Church
the sin or offense of selling or granting for personal advantage church appointments, benefices, preferments, etc. — simonist, n.
See also: Sin
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.simony - traffic in ecclesiastical offices or prefermentssimony - traffic in ecclesiastical offices or preferments
traffic - buying and selling; especially illicit trade
Translations

simony

[ˈsaɪmənɪ] Nsimonía f

simony

n (old Eccl) → Simonie f
References in periodicals archive ?
Kirkham (222) also finds in this novella allusions to Dante's bolge of the flatterers (who are immersed in human dung), of the simoniacs (Simon Magus, who shares the doctor's name, was, like him, a believer in magic who plummets to earth headfirst), and of the diviners (who include, as we have seen, Michael Scott) in Inferno 18-20.
As she busies herself with teapots, Coca Cola cans, frozen meat, lighting a broiler, and adjusting her apron, O'Donnell injects gory vignettes from The Inferno--e.g., "Simoniacs ...
In the former we find two ditches of Malebolge (simoniacs and diviners) treated by one canto each (19 and 20) followed by one pouch (barrators) treated by two (21 and 22).
Reading list: Adso of Montier-en-Der's De vita et tempore Antichristi; Humbert of Moyenmoutier's Three Books against the Simoniacs; Bonacursus' Manifestatio heresies catarorum; Arras' c.1200 (C.E.) sermon; Liber de duobus principibus; Vindication of the Church of God; Vision of Isaiah; The Interrogation of John or The Secret Supper.