simoom

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Related to simooms: simoon, Simoom or Simoon

si·moom

 (sĭ-mo͞om′) also si·moon (-mo͞on′)
n.
A strong, hot, sand-laden wind of the Sahara and Arabian Deserts: "Stephen's heart had withered up like a flower of the desert that feels the simoom coming from afar" (James Joyce). Also called samiel.

[Arabic samūm, from samma, to poison, from Aramaic sammā, drug, poison; see śmm in Semitic roots.]

simoom

(sɪˈmuːm) or

simoon

n
(Physical Geography) a strong suffocating sand-laden wind of the deserts of Arabia and North Africa. Also called: samiel
[from Arabic samūm poisonous, from sam poison, from Aramaic sammā poison]

si•moom

(sɪˈmum, saɪ-)

also si•moon

(-ˈmun)
n.
a violent sandstorm occurring in the deserts of Africa and Asia.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.simoom - a violent hot sand-laden wind on the deserts of Arabia and North Africasimoom - a violent hot sand-laden wind on the deserts of Arabia and North Africa
air current, current of air, wind - air moving (sometimes with considerable force) from an area of high pressure to an area of low pressure; "trees bent under the fierce winds"; "when there is no wind, row"; "the radioactivity was being swept upwards by the air current and out into the atmosphere"
References in classic literature ?
It evidently wanted to go on, and prognosticate drought, and water famine, and sunstroke, and simooms, and such things, but the peg prevented it, and it had to be content with pointing to the mere commonplace "very dry.
So that Monsoons, Pampas, Nor-Westers, Harmattans, Trades; any wind but the Levanter and Simoom, might blow Moby Dick into the devious zig-zag world-circle of the Pequod's circumnavigating wake.
With it, every thing is possible; without it, I fall back into the dangers and difficulties as well as the natural obstacles that ordinarily attend such an expedition: with it, neither heat, nor torrents, nor tempests, nor the simoom, nor unhealthy climates, nor wild animals, nor savage men, are to be feared