simplified


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sim·pli·fy

 (sĭm′plə-fī′)
tr.v. sim·pli·fied, sim·pli·fy·ing, sim·pli·fies
To make simple or simpler, as:
a. To reduce in complexity or extent.
b. To reduce to fundamental parts.
c. To make easier to understand.

[French simplifier, from Old French, from Medieval Latin simplificāre : Latin simplus, simple; see simple + Latin -ficāre, -fy.]

sim′pli·fi·ca′tion (-fĭ-kā′shən) n.
sim′pli·fi′er n.

simplified

(ˈsɪmplɪfaɪd)
adj
1. made less complicated, clearer, or easier
2. (Mathematics) maths reduced to a simpler form by cancellation of common factors, regrouping of terms in the same variable, etc
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.simplified - made easy or uncomplicated
easy - posing no difficulty; requiring little effort; "an easy job"; "an easy problem"; "an easy victory"; "the house is easy to heat"; "satisfied with easy answers"; "took the easy way out of his dilemma"
Translations
مُبَسَّط
zjednodušený
forenklet
egyszerûsítettleegyszerûsített
einfaldaîur
zjednodušený
poenostavljen
basitleştirilmiş

simplified

[ˈsɪmplɪfaɪd] adj [version, account] → simplifié(e)

simplified

adjvereinfacht

simple

(ˈsimpl) adjective
1. not difficult; easy. a simple task.
2. not complicated or involved. The matter is not as simple as you think.
3. not fancy or unusual; plain. a simple dress/design; He leads a very simple life.
4. pure; mere. the simple truth.
5. trusting and easily cheated. She is too simple to see through his lies.
6. weak in the mind; not very intelligent. I'm afraid he's a bit simple, but he's good with animals.
ˈsimpleton (-tən) noun
a foolish person.
simplicity (simˈplisəti) noun
the state of being simple. The beauty of this idea is its simplicity; He answered with a child's simplicity.
ˌsimplifiˈcation noun
1. the process of making simpler.
2. something made simpler; a simpler form. The Americans have made some simplifications in English spelling.
ˈsimplified adjective
made less difficult or complicated. simplified language/tasks.
ˈsimplify (-plifai) verb
to make simpler. Can you simplify your language a little?
ˈsimply adverb
1. only. I do it simply for the money.
2. absolutely. simply beautiful.
3. in a simple manner. She was always very simply dressed.
ˌsimple-ˈminded adjective
of low intelligence; stupid.
ˌsimple-ˈmindedness noun
References in classic literature ?
They stood out strengthened and simplified now, like the image of the plough against the sun.
My position was simple enough, plain enough; how could it ever be simplified more?
Thus restrained and simplified, it sounded more credible: I felt as I went on that Miss Temple fully believed me.
It might have simplified my office very much, if I had known it before.
Our epoch, the epoch of the bourgeoisie, possesses, however, this distinctive feature: it has simplified the class antagonisms: Society as a whole is more and more splitting up into two great hostile camps, into two great classes, directly facing each other: Bourgeoisie and Proletariat.
That touched him extremely, and he thought it simplified his situation until he found it did not.
Simplified like the death-mask of a handsome face, it perhaps produced for her just then an effect akin to the stir of an expression in the "set" commemorative plaster.
In this case the matter was simplified by Brunton's intelligence being quite first-rate, so that it was unnecessary to make any allowance for the personal equation, as the astronomers have dubbed it.
We are camped near Temnin-el-Foka--a name which the boys have simplified a good deal, for the sake of convenience in spelling.
He did not see her in the body; he seemed curiously to see her as a shape of light, the light itself; he seemed, simplified and exhausted as he was, to be like one of those lost birds fascinated by the lighthouse and held to the glass by the splendor of the blaze.
That is the well-beneficed point of view, you perceive, from which difficulties are much simplified," he ended, smiling.
Our clothes were mended, turned, and darned to the utmost verge of decency; our food, always plain, was now simplified to an unprecedented degree--except my father's favourite dishes; our coals and candles were painfully economized--the pair of candles reduced to one, and that most sparingly used; the coals carefully husbanded in the half-empty grate: especially when my father was out on his parish duties, or confined to bed through illness--then we sat with our feet on the fender, scraping the perishing embers together from time to time, and occasionally adding a slight scattering of the dust and fragments of coal, just to keep them alive.

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