sinecure


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

si·ne·cure

 (sī′nĭ-kyo͝or′, sĭn′ĭ-)
n.
1. A position or office that requires little or no work but provides a salary.
2. Archaic An ecclesiastical benefice not attached to the spiritual duties of a parish.

[From Medieval Latin (beneficium) sine cūrā, (benefice) without cure (of souls) : Latin sine, without + Latin cūrā, ablative of cūra, care; see cure.]

si′ne·cur·ism n.
si′ne·cur′ist n.

sinecure

(ˈsaɪnɪˌkjʊə)
n
1. a paid office or post involving minimal duties
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a Church benefice to which no spiritual or pastoral charge is attached
[C17: from Medieval Latin phrase (beneficium) sine cūrā (benefice) without cure (of souls), from Latin sine without + cūra cure, care]
ˈsineˌcurism n
ˈsineˌcurist n

si•ne•cure

(ˈsaɪ nɪˌkyʊər, ˈsɪn ɪ-)

n.
1. an office or position requiring little or no work, esp. one yielding profitable returns.
2. Archaic. an ecclesiastical benefice without cure of souls.
[1655–65; < Medieval Latin (beneficium) sine cūrā (benefice) without care]
si′ne•cure•ship`, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sinecure - a benefice to which no spiritual or pastoral duties are attached
benefice, ecclesiastical benefice - an endowed church office giving income to its holder
2.sinecure - an office that involves minimal duties
berth, billet, post, situation, position, office, place, spot - a job in an organization; "he occupied a post in the treasury"

sinecure

noun cushy number (informal), honesty, gravy train (slang), soft option, soft job (informal), money for jam or old rope (informal) a lucrative sinecure with a big law firm
Translations

sinecure

[ˈsaɪnɪkjʊəʳ] Nsinecura f

sinecure

nPfründe f, → Sinekure f (geh); this job is no sinecure!diese Arbeit ist kein Ruheposten

sinecure

[ˈsaɪnɪkjʊəʳ] nsinecura
References in classic literature ?
All people who hold sinecure offices are held in more or less respect, and as the belfry -- man of Vondervotteimittiss has the most perfect of sinecures, he is the most perfectly respected of any man in the world.
By some writers this office is called a sinecure. But not so.
He received a salary on the staff of the National Guard, where he held a sinecure which was paid for by the city of Paris; he was government commissioner to a secret society; and filled a position of superintendence in the royal household.
There being only five prisoners at Loewestein, the post of turnkey was not a very onerous one, but rather a sort of sinecure, given after a long period of service.
During the months when navigation was closed Captain Jim's office was a sinecure.
I walked in a world of their invention--they had no occasion whatever to draw upon mine; so that my time was taken only with being, for them, some remarkable person or thing that the game of the moment required and that was merely, thanks to my superior, my exalted stamp, a happy and highly distinguished sinecure. I forget what I was on the present occasion; I only remember that I was something very important and very quiet and that Flora was playing very hard.
It is true that these projections were too far apart to make the balance of the ascent anything of a sinecure, but I at least had always within my reach a point of safety to which I might cling in case of accident.
RELATES HOW OLIVER TWIST WAS VERY NEAR GETTING A PLACE WHICH WOULD NOT HAVE BEEN A SINECURE
You must prepare yourself for a querulous invalid, and for no sinecure if you get the billet."
Although elderly ladies play cards very little, just now, in American society, or, indeed, in any other, they have their inducements for rendering the well- known office of matron at a ball, a mere sinecure. Mrs.
Indeed, she has not yet recovered her equanimity on the subject, though it is now nearly three hours since dinner, and the house-floor is perfectly clean again; as clean as everything else in that wonderful house- place, where the only chance of collecting a few grains of dust would be to climb on the salt-coffer, and put your finger on the high mantel-shelf on which the glittering brass candlesticks are enjoying their summer sinecure; for at this time of year, of course, every one goes to bed while it is yet light, or at least light enough to discern the outline of objects after you have bruised your shins against them.
He was rewarded by the gift of sinecure offices from the government and did some further writing, including, probably, the patriotic lyric, 'Rule, Britannia,' and also pseudo-classical tragedies; but his only other poem of much importance is 'The Castle of Indolence' (a subject appropriate to his own good-natured, easy-going disposition), which appeared just before his death, in 1748.