sinful


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sin·ful

 (sĭn′fəl)
adj.
1. Marked by or full of sin; wicked: sinful thoughts.
2. Informal Extremely pleasing to the senses; sensuously enjoyable: sinful chocolate truffles.

sin′ful·ly adv.
sin′ful·ness n.

sinful

(ˈsɪnfʊl)
adj
1. having committed or tending to commit sin: a sinful person.
2. characterized by or being a sin: a sinful act.
ˈsinfully adv
ˈsinfulness n

sin•ful

(ˈsɪn fəl)

adj.
characterized by, guilty of, or full of sin; wicked; immoral.
[before 900]
sin′ful•ly, adv.
sin′ful•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.sinful - characterized by iniquitysinful - characterized by iniquity; wicked because it is believed to be a sin; "iniquitous deeds"; "he said it was sinful to wear lipstick"; "ungodly acts"
wicked - morally bad in principle or practice
2.sinful - having committed unrighteous actssinful - having committed unrighteous acts; "a sinful person"
unrighteous - not righteous; "an unrighteous man"; "an unrighteous law"
3.sinful - far more than usual or expected; "an extraordinary desire for approval"; "it was an over-the-top experience"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

sinful

sinful

adjective
Translations
خاطِئ، أثيم
hříšný
syndig
epämoraalinenpahasyntinen
syndsamlegur, siîspilltur
hriešny
ahlâksızkötü

sinful

[ˈsɪnfʊl] ADJ [act, thought] → pecaminoso; [person] → pecador; [town etc] → inmoral, depravado (fig) (= disgraceful) → escandaloso

sinful

[ˈsɪnfʊl] adj [person, act, world] → immoral(e); [conduct, thought] → coupable

sinful

adjsündig; person, act, thought alsosündhaft (geh); wastesündhaft (geh); it is sinful to …es ist eine Sünde, zu …

sinful

[ˈsɪnfʊl] adj (Rel) → peccaminoso/a; (waste, act) → vergognoso/a

sin

(sin) noun
wickedness, or a wicked act, especially one that breaks a religious law. It is a sin to envy the possessions of other people; Lying and cheating are both sins.
verbpast tense, past participle sinned
to do wrong; to commit a sin, especially in the religious sense. Forgive me, Father, for I have sinned.
ˈsinner noun
ˈsinful adjective
wicked.
ˈsinfully adverb
ˈsinfulness noun
References in classic literature ?
Throughout them all, giving up her individuality, she would become the general symbol at which the preacher and moralist might point, and in which they might vivify and embody their images of woman's frailty and sinful passion.
Shipmates, it is a two-stranded lesson; a lesson to us all as sinful men, and a lesson to me as a pilot of the living God.
But she looked again, guiltily, for the joy that was hers in beholding what she knew must be sinful to behold.
It is not sinful to wrangle in religious controversy; and it is not sinful to slumber over a religious book.
She felt so sinful, so guilty, that nothing was left her but to humiliate herself and beg forgiveness; and as now there was no one in her life but him, to him she addressed her prayer for forgiveness.
Oh, de good Lord God have mercy on po' sinful me-- I'S SOLE DOWN DE RIVER
Tom went about, hoping against hope for the sight of one blessed sinful face, but disappointment crossed him everywhere.
The longer she lived, the more experience and observation she had of life, the greater was her wonder at the short-sightedness of men who seek enjoyment and happiness here on earth: toiling, suffering, struggling, and harming one another, to obtain that impossible, visionary, sinful happiness.
The peculiar devotional spirit of the olden time, which placed a higher confidence in outward forms of worship than in the watchful guarding of the heart against sinful thoughts and the hands against sinful deeds, and which believed in the protecting virtues of inanimate objects made holy by contact with holy things, is illustrated in a striking manner in one of the cemeteries of Pisa.
One would have pronounced her a poor sinful soul, being tortured by Satan beneath the scarlet wicket of hell.
But such illusions were usually dissipated, on coming out of church, by hearing his voice in jocund colloquy with some of the Melthams or Greens, or, perhaps, the Murrays themselves; probably laughing at his own sermon, and hoping that he had given the rascally people something to think about; perchance, exulting in the thought that old Betty Holmes would now lay aside the sinful indulgence of her pipe, which had been her daily solace for upwards of thirty years: that George Higgins would be frightened out of his Sabbath evening walks, and Thomas Jackson would be sorely troubled in his conscience, and shaken in his sure and certain hope of a joyful resurrection at the last day.
And it is very sinful to rebel against them,' whispered the clergyman.