singularism

singularism

(ˈsɪŋɡjʊləˌrɪzəm)
n
(Philosophy) any philosophy that explains phenomena from a single principle

singularism

any philosophy that derives the universe from one principle.
See also: Philosophy
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, Weah's imperial leadership style, like his despotic predecessors, which is based on singularism and a powerful presidency as prescribed in the nation's constitution, are the reasons Liberia is ancient and backward in development and progress today.
For example, Simonton (1976) examined and listed 16 philosophical beliefs developed by thinkers in history, including empiricism, materialism, idealism, singularism, universalism, ethics of happiness, ethics of love, and so forth, and a court in the United Kingdom recognized belief in climate change as a philosophical belief (Article 29 Data Protection Working Party, 2011).
It sometimes forms part of a typology that divides theories of religious freedom into three categories: singularism, which proposes one rubric or value that is capable of rationalizing the jurisprudence; pluralism, which rejects that possibility and argues that only plural values can make sense of the doctrine in an attractive way; and skepticism, which rejects the possibility of rationalizing the doctrine.
In addition to these labels, other related terms include "reductive," "individualist," and "singularism." Gilbert also uses the term "correlative" to refer to the position that for a group to have a particular attitude (for example a belief), at least one member must share that attitude.
"Economic Singularism." Research in the History of Economic Thought and Methodology 26-A: 15-30.
SALVATORE FLORIO, "The Semantics of Plurals: A Defense of Singularism." Advisers: Stewart Shapiro, Nell Tennant.
In the first chapter, Grippe introduces a distinction he borrows from Michael Krausz between singularism and multiplism as applied to interpretation.
In facilitating the progress of society from one of cultural singularism to one of cultural pluralism, administrators and faculty must provide leadership of individuals commitment to a social system where individual worth and dignity are fundamental tenants; thus, requiring nursing school administrators to design their total educational process and educational content to reflect a commitment to cultural pluralism.
Butenschon then outlines three types of citizenship regimes: "singularism," where one group or tribe dominates the state community, as in Saudi Arabia or Israel; "pluralism," where a multicultural community is governed through the power sharing of mediating elites, as in Lebanon; and "universalism," where individual identity rather than group identity determines each citizen's equal status.
In addition to the religious singularism that he rejects for obvious reasons, he presents unscrupulous and unrestrained capitalism as yet another national affliction.
The Jewish religious tradition expresses itself in a fusion of universalism and singularism. On the one hand, Jews are vitally concerned with the problems affecting the common destiny of man.