cardiac arrhythmia

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Related to sinus arrhythmia: Sinus tachycardia

cardiac arrhythmia

A disturbance in the electrical impulses to the heart which results in an irregular rhythm or rate of heartbeat.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cardiac arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heartcardiac arrhythmia - an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart
cardiopathy, heart disease - a disease of the heart
flutter - abnormally rapid beating of the auricles of the heart (especially in a regular rhythm); can result in heart block
cantering rhythm, gallop rhythm - cardiac rhythm characterized by the presence of an extra sound; can indicate a heart abnormality
atrial fibrillation - fibrillation of the muscles of the atria of the heart
bradycardia - abnormally slow heartbeat
Adams-Stokes syndrome, atrioventricular block, heart block, Stokes-Adams syndrome - recurrent sudden attacks of unconsciousness caused by impaired conduction of the impulse that regulates the heartbeat
premature ventricular contraction, PVC - irregularity of cardiac rhythm; recurrent occurrences can be a precursor of ventricular fibrillation
tachycardia - abnormally rapid heartbeat (over 100 beats per minute)
ventricular fibrillation - fibrillation of heart muscles resulting in interference with rhythmic contractions of the ventricles and possibly leading to cardiac arrest
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Caption: Figure 1: Telemetry strip showing sinus pause of 6.2 seconds, with atrial escape (marked P waves) with failed conductions to ventricles, likely representing high vagal tone during deglutition, followed by restoration of sinus rhythm (sinus arrhythmia).
Cardiorespiratory coupling (CRC) is perhaps best typified by the occurrence of respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) (Garcia 2013).
It may present as respiratory sinus arrhythmia, a natural periodic variation in HR, or it may be an index of a severe heart condition [16].
As shown in Table 1,theprimary abnormalities we detected were sinus arrhythmia and atrioventricular block.
A study reported a 34-year-old acclimatized patient with sleep apnea syndrome climbing mountain 7000 m above sea level and during sleep developed cyclic sinus arrhythmia with R-R intervals of up to 3.3 seconds.
The main periodic fluctuations found are respiratory sinus arrhythmia and baroreflex related and thermoregulation related heart rate variability (Akselrod et al., 1985).
"Sinus arrhythmia is a variation in heartbeat frequency relative to breathing, and the bears show an extreme form of this," said T?ien.
HRT expresses ventriculophasic sinus arrhythmia, i.e., the early acceleration and the late deceleration of sinus rhythm after single VPB (ventricular premature beat), and it is considered to reflect autonomic nervous system function.
Spectral analysis: Spectral power in low frequency band (LF: 0.04-0.15 Hz) which determined sympathetic and parasympathetic activity and 0.1 Hz reflected mainly baroreflex activity; spectral power in high frequency band (HF: 0.15-0.5 Hz) reflecting mainly parasympathetic activity (respiratory sinus arrhythmia), total spectral power (TP), coefficient of component variance in low (CCV LF) and high (CCV HF) frequency bands to eliminate differences in the mean R-R level and their impact on the amplitude of oscillations (19-21).
Researchers compared peak-to-valley differences in respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) to reflect autonomic nervous system functioning.
It has been suggested that these positive clinical results may be partly due to the restoration of a state of relaxed wakefulness with closed eyes, of respiratory sinus arrhythmia or respiratory arrhythmia in the form of the synchronization of the cardiac and respiratory rhythms (Eckberg, 1995; Hatch, Borchering, & German, 1992; Lehrer et al., 1997; Schafer, Rosenblum, Kurths, & Abel, 1998; Schiek, Drepper, Engbert, Abel, & Suder, 1998; Zwiener, Schelenz, Bramer, & Hoyer, 2001, among others).