sinusoidal projection


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Related to sinusoidal projection: Mollweide projection
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sinusoidal projection

sinusoidal projection

n.
An equal-area map projection in which parallels and the prime meridian are straight lines and the other meridians are increasingly curved outward from the prime meridian.

sinusoidal projection

n
(Physical Geography) an equal-area map projection on which all parallels are straight lines and all except the prime meridian are sine curves, often used to show tropical latitudes. Also called: Sanson-Flamsteed projection

sinusoi′dal projec`tion


n.
an equal-area projection with straight parallels spaced at regular intervals and curved meridians symmetrical to a straight central meridian that is half as long as the equator.
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sinusoidal projection

si·nu·soi·dal projection

(sī′nə-soid′l)
A method of making a flat map of the Earth so that the parallels and the prime meridians are straight lines and the other meridians are curved outward from the prime meridian. Compare conic projection, homolosine projection, Mercator projection.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sinusoidal projection - an equal-area map projection showing parallels and the equator as straight lines and other meridians as curvedsinusoidal projection - an equal-area map projection showing parallels and the equator as straight lines and other meridians as curved; used to map tropical latitudes
equal-area map projection, equal-area projection - a map projection in which quadrilaterals formed by meridians and parallels have an area on the map proportional to their area on the globe
References in periodicals archive ?
The Sinusoidal projection was certainly used in the original Kangxi maps (Wang 1991) as well as d'Anville's province maps of China.
For example, the pointed poles of the sinusoidal projection add considerable angular distortion to polar areas, while projections with a polar line, such as the Robinson projection, introduce less shape distortion at poles.
Another innovation of the Atlas Coelestis was the use of a sinusoidal projection, also known as the Sanson-Flamsteed projection.