sirolimus


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si·ro·li·mus

 (sə-rō′lə-məs)
n.
An immunosuppressive drug produced by the actinomycete Streptomyces hygroscopicus, C15H79NO13, used in combination with cyclosporine and corticosteroids to prevent rejection of transplanted tissues or organs. Also called rapamycin.

[si-, origin unknown + (tac)rolimus.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

sirolimus

n sirolimus m, sirolimús m (INN)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Global Banking News-August 30, 2019-Concept Medical Inc wins FDA's breakthrough device designation for MagicTouch AVF Sirolimus Coated Balloon
M2 EQUITYBITES-August 30, 2019-Concept Medical Inc wins FDA's breakthrough device designation for MagicTouch AVF Sirolimus Coated Balloon
M2 PHARMA-August 30, 2019-Concept Medical Inc wins FDA's breakthrough device designation for MagicTouch AVF Sirolimus Coated Balloon
The introduction of sirolimus has provided impetus in transplantation therapeutics.
Virtue SEB is a non-coated drug-eluting angioplasty balloon that delivers a proprietary bioabsorbable, sustained-release formulation of sirolimus. In April, the U.S.
Compared with bare metal stents, drug-eluting stents (DESs) have tremendously increased therapeutic benefits for percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), predominantly represented by reduced incidence of target vessel revascularization/target lesion revascularization (TVR/TLR).[1] The first-generation DESs (G1-DESs) adopted sirolimus or paclitaxel as the coated antiproliferative medications, which effectively eliminated coronary arterial neointimal hyperplasia and thus, in-stent restenosis, mitigating the risks of TVR/TLR events.[2],[3] However, safety concerns arose because of late- and very-late stent thrombosis associated with G1-DES,[4],[5] prompting the development of second-generation DESs (G2-DESs).
As a novel agent, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor, sirolimus, has been recommended for the treatment of the diffuse form of CHI, unresponsive to diazoxide and octreotide.
The novel stent, developed by Envision Scientific of India, is coated with sirolimus on the abluminal side.
At age 15, a trial of daily sirolimus therapy was initiated, based on a case report by Yuksekkaya et al.
At this time, we decided to put the patient on sirolimus (1 milligram twice daily) as the main medication for her systemic and pulmonary symptoms.
Although ruxolitinib is generally well tolerated [6], here we describe a case of life-threatening hypertriglyceridemia associated with concomitant use of sirolimus and ruxolitinib for GVHD.