sit out


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Related to sit out: shy away from, follow-through, look to, in view of, showed up, dropped off

sit

 (sĭt)
v. sat (săt), sit·ting, sits
v.intr.
1. To rest with the torso vertical and the body supported on the buttocks.
2.
a. To rest with the hindquarters lowered onto a supporting surface. Used of animals.
b. To perch. Used of birds.
3. To cover eggs for hatching; brood.
4. To be situated or located: a house that sits on a hill.
5. To lie or rest: Dishes were sitting on a shelf. See Usage Note at set1.
6. To pose for an artist or photographer.
7.
a. To occupy a seat as a member of a body of officials: sit in Congress.
b. To be in session.
8. To remain inactive or unused: Her expensive skis sat gathering dust.
9. To affect one with or as if with a burden; weigh: Official duties sat heavily upon the governor.
10. To fit, fall, or drape in a specified manner: The jacket sits perfectly on you.
11. To be agreeable to one; please: The idea didn't sit well with any of us.
12. Chiefly British To take an examination, as for a degree.
13. To blow from a particular direction. Used of the wind.
14. To keep watch or take care of a child.
v.tr.
1. To cause to sit; seat: Sit yourself over there.
2. To keep one's seat on (an animal): She sits her horse well.
3. To sit on (eggs) for the purpose of hatching.
4. To provide seating accommodation for: a theater that sits 1,000 people.
n.
1.
a. The act of sitting.
b. A period of time spent sitting.
2. The way in which an article of clothing, such as a dress or jacket, fits.
Phrasal Verbs:
sit down
To take a seat.
sit in
1. To be present or participate as a visitor at a discussion or music session.
2. To act as a substitute: She sat in for the vacationing news anchor.
3. To take part in a sit-in.
sit on (or upon)
1. To confer about.
2. To suppress or repress: sat on the evidence.
3. To postpone action or resolution regarding.
4. Slang To rebuke sharply; reprimand.
sit out
1. To stay until the end of.
2. To refrain from taking part in: sit out a dance.
sit up
1. To rise from lying down to a sitting position.
2. To sit with the spine erect.
3. To stay up later than the customary bedtime.
4. To become suddenly alert: The students sat up when he mentioned the test.
Idioms:
sit on (one's) hands
To fail to act.
sit pretty Informal
To be in a very favorable position.
sit tight Informal
To be patient and await the next move.

[Middle English sitten, from Old English sittan; see sed- in Indo-European roots.]

sit out

vb (adverb)
1. (tr) to endure to the end: I sat out the play although it was terrible.
2. (tr) to remain seated throughout (a dance, etc)
3. (Nautical Terms) (intr) chiefly Brit to lean backwards over the side of a light sailing boat in order to carry the centre of gravity as far to windward as possible to reduce heeling. US and Canadian term: hike out
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sit out - not participate in (an activity, such as a dance or a sports event); "He sat out the game"
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
refrain, forbear - resist doing something; "He refrained from hitting him back"; "she could not forbear weeping"
2.sit out - endure to the end
brook, endure, tolerate, stomach, abide, bear, digest, stick out, suffer, put up, stand, support - put up with something or somebody unpleasant; "I cannot bear his constant criticism"; "The new secretary had to endure a lot of unprofessional remarks"; "he learned to tolerate the heat"; "She stuck out two years in a miserable marriage"
Translations
يَبْقى جالِسا أثْناء الرَّقْصيَبقى هادئا ومُنْتَظِرا
přečkat do koncevynechat
holde ud til slutningen af
kihagykivárja a végét
òraukataka ekki òátt í
počkať do koncavynechať
oturmaksabırla oturup beklemek

w>sit out

vt sep
(= stay to end) play, film, meetingbis zum Schluss or Ende (sitzen) bleiben bei, bis zum Schluss or Ende durch- or aushalten (pej); stormauf das Ende (+gen)warten; problemaussitzen; wardurchstehen; we’d better sit it outwir bleiben besser bis zum Ende (hier)
danceauslassen; I’ll sit this one outich setze diesmal aus; to sit out a round (in game) → eine Runde aussetzen

sit

(sit) present participle sitting: past tense, past participle sat (sӕt) verb
1. to (cause to) rest on the buttocks; to (cause to) be seated. He likes sitting on the floor; They sat me in the chair and started asking questions.
2. to lie or rest; to have a certain position. The parcel is sitting on the table.
3. (with on) to be an official member of (a board, committee etc). He sat on several committees.
4. (of birds) to perch. An owl was sitting in the tree by the window.
5. to undergo (an examination).
6. to take up a position, or act as a model, in order to have one's picture painted or one's photograph taken. She is sitting for a portrait/photograph.
7. (of a committee, parliament etc) to be in session. Parliament sits from now until Christmas.
ˈsitter noun
1. a person who poses for a portrait etc.
2. a baby-sitter.
ˈsitting noun
a period of continuous action, meeting etc. I read the whole book at one sitting; The committee were prepared for a lengthy sitting.
ˈsit-in noun
an occupation of a building etc by protesters. The students staged a sit-in.
ˈsitting-room noun
a room used mainly for sitting in.
sitting target, sitting duck
someone or something that is in an obvious position to be attacked. If they're reducing staff, he's a sitting target.
sit back
to rest and take no part in an activity. He just sat back and let it all happen.
sit down
to (cause to) take a seat, take a sitting position. Let's sit down over here; He sat the child down on the floor.
sit out
1. to remain seated during a dance. Let's sit (this one) out.
2. to remain inactive and wait until the end of. They'll try to sit out the crisis.
sit tight
to keep the same position or be unwilling to move or act. The best thing to do is to sit tight and see if things improve.
sit up
1. to rise to a sitting position. Can the patient sit up?
2. to remain awake, not going to bed. I sat up until 3 a.m. waiting for you!
References in periodicals archive ?
But Escobar required surgery to remove bone chips in 1997, forcing him to sit out six weeks.
On Tuesday, Bonds said that after two knee operations and a winter of steroids accusations, he's so ``tired'' that he may sit out part or all of the upcoming season.
255, was benched for Friday's game and will sit out tonight's game.