sixpence


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six·pence

 (sĭks′pəns)
n.
1. A coin formerly used in Britain and worth six pennies.
2. The sum of six pennies.

sixpence

(ˈsɪkspəns)
n
(Currencies) a small British cupronickel coin with a face value of six pennies, worth 2 (new) pence, not minted since 1970

six•pence

(ˈsɪks pəns)

n., pl. -pence, -penc•es for 2.
1. (used with a sing. or pl. v.) Brit. a sum of six pennies.
2. (used with a sing. v.) a cupronickel coin of the United Kingdom, the half of a shilling, formerly equal to six pennies: equal to two and one-half new pence after decimalization in 1971.
[1350–1400; Middle English sexe pans. See six, pence]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sixpence - a small coin of the United Kingdom worth six pennies; not minted since 1970
Britain, Great Britain, U.K., UK, United Kingdom, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland - a monarchy in northwestern Europe occupying most of the British Isles; divided into England and Scotland and Wales and Northern Ireland; `Great Britain' is often used loosely to refer to the United Kingdom
coin - a flat metal piece (usually a disc) used as money
Translations

sixpence

[ˈsɪkspəns] N (Brit) (formerly) → seis peniques mpl

sixpence

[ˈsɪkspəns] n (coin) → moneta da sei penny (non più in circolazione legale); (value) → sei penny mpl
References in classic literature ?
We can't charge more than sixpence a mile after the first, within the four-mile radius.
But the Cat's-meat Man wasn't very rich and he only got sick once a year--at Christmas-time, when he used to give the Doctor sixpence for a bottle of medicine.
He held the sixpence in the palm of his hand, and looking at it thoughtfully, spoke to us in English.
The other sixpence is to spend in the diversions of London; and the diversion I recommend is going to the top of the Monument, and sitting there.
Mary felt that she could have forgone this display of animal good temper, but seeing that Ralph, for some curious reason, took a pride in the sparrows, she bet him sixpence that he would not succeed.
Peter Pan authorises me to say that you shall all be paid sixpence a day.
Look'ee, deary; give me three-and- sixpence, and don't you be afeard for me.
I didn't have to put my hand in my pocket for sixpence.
Then the customer of comparatively tender years would get suddenly disconcerted at having to deal with a woman, and with rage in his heart would proffer a request for a bottle of marking ink, retail value sixpence (price in Verloc's shop one-and-sixpence), which, once outside, he would drop stealthily into the gutter.
There was then a great to-do to make the pony hold up his head that the bearing-rein might be fastened; at last even this was effected; and the old gentleman, taking his seat and the reins, put his hand in his pocket to find a sixpence for Kit.
In the midst of them, the hangman, ever busy and ever worse than useless, was in constant requisition; now, stringing up long rows of miscellaneous criminals; now, hanging a housebreaker on Saturday who had been taken on Tuesday; now, burning people in the hand at Newgate by the dozen, and now burning pamphlets at the door of Westminster Hall; to-day, taking the life of an atrocious murderer, and to-morrow of a wretched pilferer who had robbed a farmer's boy of sixpence.
A poor tired Italian organ-grinder, tramping with an equally tired monkey along the dusty roads, had to be bought off in a similar manner,--though he only cost sixpence.