skiddy


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skid·dy

 (skĭd′ē)
adj. skid·di·er, skid·di·est
Liable to skid or cause skidding: a light, skiddy car; skiddy roads.

skid•dy

(ˈskɪd i)

adj. -di•er, -di•est.
tending to skid or cause skidding.
[1900–05]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mark Wood is a quick, skiddy sort of bowler, so England didn't really have someone to partner Chris Woakes, like Australia had with Jason Behrendorff to back up Mitchell Starc.
It was a little skiddy as well so didn't want to do sweeping.
Capable of eye-catching speed from a low, skiddy trajectory but occasionally tempted to settle into more prosaic spells.
Capable of eyecatching speed from a low, skiddy trajectory but occasionally tempted to settle into more prosaic spells.
We talked at the interval bowling slightly at back of a length because the wicket was quite skiddy," he said.
He was short, left-arm and skiddy, and scored a few runs in the lower-middle order.
He impressed with his unique action he takes off on his right foot in his pre-delivery stride and lands on the right foot again and skiddy pace.
The key was to hold your shape when you play your shots, especially on these low and skiddy wickets.
The mare had approached the 'show' hurdle at speed and came to a skiddy stop, lifting Russell out of the saddle, but without threatening to unseat him.
Leaden skies, skiddy pitches and swampy outfields would have put a spring in the step of bowlers across the region - but most games, particularly those around Southport itself, simply couldn't go ahead.
He TO GO: Wood might not have taken any wickets at The Oval, but his extra pace and skiddy style makes him a vital partnership-breaker in his first global tournament.
But his attacking instincts left him in no position to deal with some skiddy extra pace as Barry McCarthy's next ball pinned him lbw.